Best Flugelhorns in 2020



Bach FH600 Aristocrat Series Bb Flugelhorn FH600 Lacquer Review:


This horn is a vast improvement over the Hawk I purchased when I began my study of the flugelhorn two years ago. The Hawk is a nightmare in its poor valve fittings and general workmanship. By contrast the Bach is smooth in its functioning and has a fine sound. I believe the instrument to be a fine value at its current price.



Allora AAFG-103F Series Bb Flugelhorn Review:


I took a chance on this item because I wanted a flugelhorn and the price was right...make that VERY right. That's why I say I was taking a chance--we get suspicious of low prices. There were five customer reviews here and they were all good. Additionally, everything I could find on the Net about this Allora model was positive. However, I have to say that I've been burned before by relying on customer reviews. Nevertheless, I'm writing one now, because on receiving this horn I was frankly astonished. It is a beautiful thing, just beautiful.

Based on my past experience with trumpets (but no previous experience with flugelhorns) this Allora surprised me with its weight. To me it is a heavy instrument. Looks kind of slender and maybe even delicate in the four sharp pictures provided by Amazon, but you can take my word for it, this thing is solid! It is very well made, above average in build quality, and everything you see in the pictures accurately reflects this. All the fixtures, braces, slides, locks, and spit valves are precision fitted, well sprung, and smoothly functional. The valves are smooth and quiet, and the pinky lever on the right side is likewise solidly designed and moves smooth and easy. Tuning is done via a telescoping lead pipe with a twist key lock--again, solid, tight and smooth.

I just can't get over the build quality of this instrument, especially considering the price. As for the tone quality, I can't pose as an expert, although some have commented that any difference between the Allora flugel and those of the big guys like Yamaha would be minimal at most and probably not detectable to the average listener. To hear it for yourself, go to WWBW.com where you'll find a short video wherein a store guy plays a few notes. For me that was impressive enough to put me over the top in deciding to take a "chance" on my purchase.

Though not mentioned anywhere that I could see, it does come with a hard-shell case that won't impress anyone visually but will protect this little darling very well. It does not come with accessories of any kind, cleaning or lubricating products, or even a brief manual.

I've read rumors, guesses, and strongly held but erroneous opinions online about where the horn is made, from China to Timbuktu and beyond, but a reliable source places it in the former East Germany, in a factory that was abandoned by the Soviets when they skedaddled back in the '90s, then rebuilt by today's unified Germany.

I bought the 3 year protection plan but wonder if I'll ever need it.



[20% Off Launching Sale] WindSorb | spit absorber & container (5Hr Model for Trumpet) Review:


My wife is disgusted by the thought of spit valves. I've tried explaining it's condensed water vapor rather than spit, but that doesn't cut any ice with her. And I'm more disgusted by her suggestion that I drain the valve into a yogurt pot (a spitoon by any other name). So, when I found the WindSorb on Amazon, I jumped at it. In fact, I got two.

The manufacturer does advise that it’s only for trumpet, but i wanted to try it on cornet, too.

So far, I've tried the Windsorb on four horns.

1) Bach Strad 180S37. The Windsorb fits perfectly. Problem solved. I can practice for hours without making a puddle on the floor. Wife is happy, and therefore I'm happy ;-)
2) Jupiter JTR600ML. Again a perfect fit. I haven't tried the Windsorb on the 3rd valve slide, but I don't end up draining that too often
3) Jupiter JCR520 cornet. A reasonable fit. The cornet has Amati valves, which the Windsorb goes over just fine. The problem is the strut between the leadpipe and the third valve slide. On British-model (short/sheperd's crook) cornets, the Windsorb just clips the strut, so you have to put it on slightly crooked.
4) Kawai KCR500 soprano cornet. On a soprano cornet, the fit is even worse: the strut is so far forward that the Windsorb has to go on at a jaunty angle

For Bb trumpet players, it's a solid 5*.

For shepherd’s crook cornet players it's still a 4* just because of the slight 'camber', and for Sop players it's probably a 3* because it has to be at such a precarious angle. It may not be a problem on all cornets (especially American long-model ones), and you could probably fix it if you were willing to take a knife to the Windsorb (I'm not).

If you own a trumpet, buy this and your significant other, the non-brass players in your band or orchestra, your audiences, and the owners of the halls where you play will love you forever and you'll never again hear "Ewww! Gross!!!! What are you doing???"



Tromba TF-BL Pro Professional Plastic BB Flugelhorn, Black Review:


For what it's worth, I'm a trombone player, but I also double on trumpet, and I've been playing brass instruments for about 10 years now. I bought this just on a whim, and for what it's worth, it does a good job. The mouthpiece that comes with the horn, unlike other plastic instruments, is metal, stamped "Tromba" but otherwise no size markings. Another reviewer said it was a copy of the Denis Wick 4FL, so I'll take their word for it.

It comes with a gig bag, cleaning snake, 2 brushes (one for your valves, and one for your mouthpiece), and a second set of valve stems, as well as a second set of springs, should you ever need to replace the current ones. Unnecessary, but a nice touch nonetheless.

Pros: It's plastic and durable. It's also extremely light, obviously. Nice, warm, mellow sound. Valves are nice and fast (faster than my King Silver Flair... should probably get that checked out). Tuning slides move freely.

Cons: From a low C (concert Bb) to above-staff F (concert Eb), it is in tune. However, where the G is supposed to be, is actually a slightly sharp F# (concert E). It's possible to lip it, but it's extremely flat, almost completely unusable. Going above an A (concert G), it becomes very squirrelly and hard to control. I took out my tuner, and I kept fluctuating between A and A# (but another reviewer said this is common among other flugelhorns as well).

The valves also don't "sit" in the valve casing, and they don't click/lock into place like many other trumpets or trumpet-like instruments. You have to twist them around to align them, and it becomes a bit of a guessing game as to where they align (hint: it's the locking pegs; if you buy the horn, you'll see what I mean). They're also quite noisy, and depressing them while playing a fast passage can be quite audible.

Overall, I like it. It's my first venture into plastic instruments (I have played a pBone before, and those aren't half bad either). I probably wouldn't do a serious performance with it, but it certainly is nice to keep around and practice. No leaks, no cracks, no damage to the horn upon arrival. Ships in a Tromba box, and the horn definitely looks as advertised.



Tromba Pro Professional Plastic Bb Flugelhorn, Golden Review:


For what it's worth, I'm a trombone player, but I also double on trumpet, and I've been playing brass instruments for about 10 years now. I bought this just on a whim, and for what it's worth, it does a good job. The mouthpiece that comes with the horn, unlike other plastic instruments, is metal, stamped "Tromba" but otherwise no size markings. Another reviewer said it was a copy of the Denis Wick 4FL, so I'll take their word for it.

It comes with a gig bag, cleaning snake, 2 brushes (one for your valves, and one for your mouthpiece), and a second set of valve stems, as well as a second set of springs, should you ever need to replace the current ones. Unnecessary, but a nice touch nonetheless.

Pros: It's plastic and durable. It's also extremely light, obviously. Nice, warm, mellow sound. Valves are nice and fast (faster than my King Silver Flair... should probably get that checked out). Tuning slides move freely.

Cons: From a low C (concert Bb) to above-staff F (concert Eb), it is in tune. However, where the G is supposed to be, is actually a slightly sharp F# (concert E). It's possible to lip it, but it's extremely flat, almost completely unusable. Going above an A (concert G), it becomes very squirrelly and hard to control. I took out my tuner, and I kept fluctuating between A and A# (but another reviewer said this is common among other flugelhorns as well).

The valves also don't "sit" in the valve casing, and they don't click/lock into place like many other trumpets or trumpet-like instruments. You have to twist them around to align them, and it becomes a bit of a guessing game as to where they align (hint: it's the locking pegs; if you buy the horn, you'll see what I mean). They're also quite noisy, and depressing them while playing a fast passage can be quite audible.

Overall, I like it. It's my first venture into plastic instruments (I have played a pBone before, and those aren't half bad either). I probably wouldn't do a serious performance with it, but it certainly is nice to keep around and practice. No leaks, no cracks, no damage to the horn upon arrival. Ships in a Tromba box, and the horn definitely looks as advertised.



Tromba TF-SL Pro Professional Plastic BB Flugelhorn, Silver Review:


I received the horn, and this was my first foray into the world of Flugelhorn. I have played cornet/trumpet off and on for over four decades now. I have typically used a "C" style cup, and the deep V cup of the Flugelhorn is taking some time to acclimate my lips to play. Overall, it is a nicely put together instrument. I am only a part time player, and I think it will suit my needs well. I am impressed with the price point, and have made some very pretty (and mellow) sounds on it thus far. I believe I will keep it as a different sound for my playing. I am not switching from cornet to Flugelhorn - however, I do have a deep V cup short shank cornet mouthpiece on order. Playing this horn has given me the hankering for a dual sound on my main player - the cornet. Thanks, Tromba. For its purpose, the occasional Flugel player, this is a very affordable way to get that sound. And finally, my grandchildren can play on it - without me worrying about dents and dings!