Best Ceiling Fan Wall Controls in 2020



Lutron SFSQ-FH-WH Electronics Slide-To-Off Fan Speed Control, White Review:


Works well controlling my fan using a dedicated circuit. I removed the remote control circuitry from my ceiling fan and wired the fan power wire to this controller which is now responsible for managing the electrical power going to the fan. It works well, with three on speeds and one off. For reasons I'm not sure, it also has the ability to reverse the fan by turning the fan on and off quickly. If I do that a few times I can get the fan to reverse direction. I think that is a property of the fan and not the switch.

I started with two switches in a junction box with separate wires; one for the fan and one for the light. But the power was wired so that either switch powered an electronic control unit that could control both fan and light and set fan speed and light intensity. This was awkward and confusing as you had to turn on one switch and then use the remote and the other switch did nothing. Instead I pulled out the electronic control unit from within the ceiling fan and wired the fan and light to each switch separately. For the fan I used this controller; for the light an LED dimmer switch. Now the controls are intuitive and easy.



Honeywell Add-On In-Wall Paddle Switch for Honeywell Smart Lighting Controls ONLY | NOT A STANDALONE SWITCH | White & Almond Paddles | for 3 4 & 5-Way Multi-Location Installations, 39350 Review:


Perfect pairing with SmartThings.
Turn off the blue indicator light (blue LED) on the switch by pressing the up (on) 3x fast, then down (off) once. This has to be done quickly, but will turn off the blue LED. Do the same thing to turn it back on. I found this a must for the bedroom switches as the LED is way too bright, but is perfect for other areas of the house to find the switches at night.
Pair the switches up with motion sensors in each room and automate your lighting. Set up multiple scenes / automations for different brightness levels based on ambient light or time, or disable them from coming on automatically when in a certain mode (bedtime).
I had installed motion lighting in another house of mine, but this is taking it to another level that just makes more sense. All lights and fans turn off when we leave and set the alarm, then select few turn back on when we arrive. It's so nice to not have to use switches throughout the house anymore as our lights and fans are automatically controlled for us, and turn off on their own based on certain timers, different for each area and its purpose.

These switches are very responsive and I am very happy that they have the dim on and dim off feature as it just gives your lighting automation a much warmer and welcoming feel. Paired with some dumb (but smart) Phillips dimmable "Warm Glow Effect" bulbs and you can control the temperature (white vs warm white) with a bit more variation depending on the time of day / night. A much cheaper alternative than buying smart bulbs to let you control the temperature.

Setting up the 3 way was quick and easy. The 4 way was a bit more difficult but that's because of how my electrician had the original switches wired up, which I eventually ohmed out and figured out what was going on. If you need to do a 4 way (3 switches for a light) or more, and you're not an electrician or handy with this sort of thing, consider calling somebody over that can figure it out for you as it took me hours to figure out how it was wired up and configure these properly.



Honeywell Z-Wave Plus Smart Light Dimmer Switch, In-Wall Paddle, Interchangeable White & Almond | Built-In Repeater & Range Extender | ZWave Hub Required - SmartThings, Wink, Alexa Compatible, 39351 Review:


This Honeywell switch looks identical to GE 14291, which I recently installed and connected with my Samsung Smartthings hub. Both switches are made by JASCO. Their manuals share identical text and diagrams. Here is where their similarities end:

Pro: 1) Honeywell's manual is printed in a much bigger and readable booklet than GE's; 2) The Honeywell switch was readily recognized by my Smartthings hub, whereas GE 14291 needed a reset before being recognized.

Con: I am unable to change Honeywell's LED indicator setting. Related instructions in the manual don't work. So I am stuck with the default setting - LED on when switch off. With GE 14291, I can change its LED settings in my Smartthings app.



Broan-NuTone 66W NuTone Ventilation, Independent Switches for Heaters and Fans, 15 Amp, 120V, White Three-Function Wall Control, 20 Review:


Some other reviewers were complaining that their switch did not come with "screw type" terminals. Well, the one that was shipped to me had them. This was an easy replacement. The switches also seem to be made better than the old one that I had (which didn't have screw terminals).

I did have one issue in that the screws for the face plate seemed to be too short. I had to use washers behind the switch bracket to bring it out from the wall a little so that the face plate would fit right. I also found it curious that the new switch had on and off reversed from the old one. (And before you think I had it upside down, I double checked. Both of them have a label for the "top" of the switch.)

The "Light, Vent and Heater" labels missing from the face plate was no big deal because they wore off the old face plate long ago from regular cleaning. I have considered making labels though. Family members don't have trouble, but guests seem to be easily confused about which switch does what.



Honeywell Add-On In-Wall Paddle Switch for Honeywell Smart Lighting Controls ONLY | NOT A STANDALONE SWITCH | White & Almond Paddles | for 3 4 & 5-Way Multi-Location Installations, 39350 Review:


Perfect pairing with SmartThings.
Turn off the blue indicator light (blue LED) on the switch by pressing the up (on) 3x fast, then down (off) once. This has to be done quickly, but will turn off the blue LED. Do the same thing to turn it back on. I found this a must for the bedroom switches as the LED is way too bright, but is perfect for other areas of the house to find the switches at night.
Pair the switches up with motion sensors in each room and automate your lighting. Set up multiple scenes / automations for different brightness levels based on ambient light or time, or disable them from coming on automatically when in a certain mode (bedtime).
I had installed motion lighting in another house of mine, but this is taking it to another level that just makes more sense. All lights and fans turn off when we leave and set the alarm, then select few turn back on when we arrive. It's so nice to not have to use switches throughout the house anymore as our lights and fans are automatically controlled for us, and turn off on their own based on certain timers, different for each area and its purpose.

These switches are very responsive and I am very happy that they have the dim on and dim off feature as it just gives your lighting automation a much warmer and welcoming feel. Paired with some dumb (but smart) Phillips dimmable "Warm Glow Effect" bulbs and you can control the temperature (white vs warm white) with a bit more variation depending on the time of day / night. A much cheaper alternative than buying smart bulbs to let you control the temperature.

Setting up the 3 way was quick and easy. The 4 way was a bit more difficult but that's because of how my electrician had the original switches wired up, which I eventually ohmed out and figured out what was going on. If you need to do a 4 way (3 switches for a light) or more, and you're not an electrician or handy with this sort of thing, consider calling somebody over that can figure it out for you as it took me hours to figure out how it was wired up and configure these properly.



Lutron S2-LFSQ-WH Skylark Dimmer & Fan Control, White Review:


Works perfectly to control my fan (3 speed detents) and a smooth dimmer controls the lighting. I can verify that this DOES work with LED's. I'm using Soraa High-CRI "Vivid" series GU10 LED's and it does properly dim them, though the dimming range isn't quite as wide as I'd like--it dims to about 40% not the 10% I'd hoped for. Occasional flickers at low light levels, solved by making it slightly brighter. In all, it feels solid and works great. But since finding a true LED-specific single-space switch with lighting and fan controls is virtually impossible, this one will do for the time being.



ENERLITES Dual, 3 Speed Ceiling Control and LED Dimmer, 2.5A Single Pole Light Fan Switch, 300W Incandescent Load, No Neutral Wire Required, 17001-F3-W, White Review:


I have long wanted fan timers in our two bathrooms because we tend to forget the fans they run all day long, so i couldn't resist this deal when I saw it. The timers came attractively packaged with their wall plates and fasteners and wire nuts, so it was a simple swap with the existing switches and they work as expected.

There are six buttons that correspond to the amount of time to run the fan. Simply push the one you want and walk away knowing that you did your part to clear the air without emptying the house of its heat. The larger button on the bottom will either run the fan for the amount of time last used (for which one of the timer lights will be lit, so you know how long), cancel the fan, or put it into manual override to stay on.

Each button has a light on it. The light on the big button goes out whenever the timer is active (fan is on). The lights on the individual buttons light only for the currently selected one and blink shortly before the timer is about to time out, All of the lights go out when the timer is set to run in manual override, which is done by holding the big button in for about three seconds. The LEDs are all tiny, but extremely bright. This shouldn't be an issue but I thought it worth mentioning.

When considering this switch, remember that it requires four wires to work. A hot (Black), a neutral (white), a switched output (red), and a ground (green). All four will almost always be present if this is replacing a switch where there is already an existing fan circuit. If you have any question about this then you probably shouldn't be doing electrical work in the first place.



GE Enbrighten Z-Wave Plus Smart Fan Control, Works with Alexa, Google Assistant, SmartThings, Wink, Zwave Hub Required, Repeater/Range Extender, 3-Way Compatible, White & Light Almond, 14287 Review:


Fan Switch only review: So far, I have installed four of these smart switches for fans. GE recently changed the model (new # 14287) so that there are three (not so distinct) settings as opposed to a continuous adjustment (aka dimmer). Each position is denoted by the rate at which the LED flashes. There is NO tactile feedback when you move the speed setting. Thus, you need to pay attention to the flashing light. This can be a learning curve for the those people who have not used these (GE Z-Wave dimmer) switches. As my latest installs are at a house still under construction, I have not yet paired,or used them with a smart hub. The planned controller hub is a Vera hub.

The older style fan switch (GE # 12730) adjusted the fan from zero to 100% speed. On some fans this was a problem as the motor needed to operate at a specific speed/voltage, otherwise the fan made a buzzing noise. But, it was easy to adjust the fan speed when controlled by Alexa. For example: Alexa, set bedroom fan to 40%. I have two of these switches installed using a SmartThings controller coupled with Alexa.

GE Z-Wave On/Off switches: 12722, 12727
These are great for creating smart circuits. I prefer using the paddle type over the toggle, I have installed both. I found some of the toggle types don't seem to line up with face plate holes. These can be the master in a multi switch circuit.

GE Z-Wave Dimmers: 14294, 12729
Same comments as above. In addition, you may have to educate the end user on how to set the dimmer. It may not be intuitive, particularly the toggle switch. These can be the master in a multi switch circuit.

GE Z-Wave Dimmers: 14289 (Edit 1/21/2019)
This is a new model dimmer switch that uses a smooth face. You tap the surface for on/off and drag a finger for dimming. An interesting design, yet, I find that it falls short in execution. One tap executes on/off. When you raise your finger to and retouch the switch for dimming, or just touch it to adjust the lights, the go off! My first install has been pretty frustrating. (Edit: 2/6/2019) The female occupant in this house absolutely doesn't like it. I expect to replace it soon.

GE Z-Wave Add-On: 12723, 12728
These switches are used as part of completing a 3-way, or 4-way circuit. They are NOT stand alone switches. They MUST be used in conjunction with one of the above switches (not the fan switch). When converting a 3-way circuit from analog to digital, it can be tricky. If you are not comfortable with doing this type of work, hire an electrician. And, one that understands how to install these switches. These add-on switches require a neutral and a trailer wire from the master (where the load is located) switch to function.

ALL of the above switches require a neutral wire to function.

All of these switches require competent electrical skills to install. However, if you plan to convert your home or office to a smart home, and want the least amount of transition issues and the most out of reusing existing wiring, these are the best bang for your buck.

I had no pairing issues with any of these. I do recommend that when pairing, add them one at a time, and name them immediately, or it is easy to mix up switch locations.

Edit 2/9/18 - 14289 Smooth Dimmer switch only -- OK, the frustration level has exceeded my patience level. This switch gets removed and replaced TODAY. This idea looks cool but is ROTTEN in execution. The wife has long been frustrated, and my patience is gone. DO NOT buy this product Smooth Dimmer #14289! Every time you touch it, it turns on/off -- it is almost impossible to control as a dimmer. Your best bet on controlling the dimmer level is to use Alexa or an app. GE -- go rethink this one!



NuTone Variable Speed Wall Control for Ventilation Fans, Dial Knob Control, 3 Amp., 120V, White Review:


When first reading its reviews here was a bit underwhelmed, so taking the consensus advice ordered the Lutron three speed control for my two Broan 512 room to room fans instead. Big mistake! Both Lutron's high and medium speeds resulted in a burning aroma and even on medium did not really quiet the fans, while the lowest setting though noiseless and odor-free fell kinda short in terms of air circulation. Adding to my woes, the Lutron constantly tripped the GFCI bathroom outlet that was on the same circuit, D'oh!

Anyway, ordered the NuTone 57W from Amazon but it never arrived; was graciously issued a refund plus $5 credit and purchased another unit elsewhere. Item I finally received looks slightly different from one pictured here in that it doesn't have the Broan logo below the dial (see attached photo); seems identical in all other respects. LSS, works PERFECTLY with my two Broan/NuTone 512 fans: no whine or hum, no odor, no more tripping the GFCI. Turning the dial just 90° quiets the fans down so that I can't hear them but still moves enough air to keep my bedroom from getting stuffy. Am so relieved!

Guessing most of the negative reviews here came from those using this control with incompatible fans? Note that the 57W is spec'ed for 3A max, which would be less than some attic fans. OTOH the Broan 512 is only .7A so you should be able to gang up to four of them on one of these controllers.



Westinghouse Lighting 7787200 Ceiling Fan Wall Control Review:


...the switch is marked 1-4. You would think 1 would be the lowest speed and 4 the highest...but no. The switch works just like a fan's pull-chain (except you get 4 speeds instead of just 3): first time you pull it, it's at the highest speed, next time, the lowest, etc. So the first speed from the off position is the highest speed, and the last...fourth speed...is the lowest. They could fix this perception problem simply by marking the speeds 4-1 instead of 1-4. Other than that, pretty straightforward. Works great.