Best Electronic Drum Sets in 2020



Donner DED-200 Electric Kit Electronic with Mesh Head 8 Piece, Drum Throne, Sticks Headphone and Audio Cable Included, More Stable Iron Metal Support Set Review:


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 Awesome kit for a beginner. Lots of sounds and options. Flexible and customizable. And at that price point you just can’t beat it. This thing comes with lots of great tools to help you become a great drummer.



Alesis Surge Mesh Kit | Eight-Piece Electronic Drum Kit with Mesh Heads, Chrome Rack and Surge Drum Module including 40 Kits, 385 sounds 60 Play Aong Tracks and USB/MIDI Connectivity Review:


My wife wanted a drum kit for Christmas, and we live in an apartment. As you may have guessed a drum kit does not bode well with neighbors. So after watching some youtube videos of electronics drum sets I decided this was the way to go. From my research three brands rose to the top of all the reviews. Roland, Alesis, and Yamaha. The Roland kits are pricey, but they get stellar reviews. Alesis was more affordable, and the reviews are awesome for them as well. I will be honest I did not read much into the Yamaha. I was already set it was going to be Alesis or Roland for my wife.

After much research I decided the Alesis Surge Mesh kit was the best for her. It had all the features she needed, some expandability, and the reviews were all good!

After she opened it, set up was relatively simple. Follow the instructions which are all in pictures. After all guys don't read the words in instructions anyways. Sat the wife behind the kit, and adjusted it to fit her. And away she went. This kit is absolutely worth every penny. The drum kit sounds extremely well. Could not be happier with it's performance!

Some side notes though! So yes this kit comes with every thing you need for it, and it alone! If this is your very first drum kit you will need a throne, amplifier, and drum sticks. The kit does come with some wood tipped sticks, but in the reviews these are not the best thing for a mesh kit.

My add ons to this kit!
-Zildjan nylon tipped anti-vibe drums sticks. Made for electric drums, and feel awesome!
-Simons DA50 Amplifier, this is a must if you want to hear your drums! Great little amp! This amp with the Surge Kit is a solid combo!
-Alesis Electronic Drum Head Set. These headphones are designed for electric drums and sound amazing. Remember that part about us living in an apartment? My wife can play as loud as she wants and all you hear is the tap of the stick to the pads! These headphones are a MUST (especially for parents with young trainees :p)
-Gibraltar throne... you got a nice drum kit.... sit on something that wont make your sore or tired! Gibraltar makes the best drum thrones.
-Vic Firth drum stick caddy, seriously this is a nice addition to ANY drum kit.
-Lastly get a quality 1/4" cable to go between the control and the amp.... DO NOT CHEAP OUT! you will regret it!

All these items are available here on Amazon, or your favorite Guitar (ahem) place. :D Happy drumming!



Pyle Pro Electronic Drum kit - Portable Electric Tabletop Drum Set Machine with Digital Panel, 7 Drum Pad, Hi-Hat/Kick Bass Pedal Controller USB AUX -Tom Toms, Hi-Hat, Snare Drums, Cymbals - PTED06 Review:


I bought this on a whim. The only drums I've ever played was Rock Band. I really enjoyed that game, but the drum kit didn't last. I was going through a stressful period in my life and was thinking back to those fun times with Rock Band. I decided to buy this set just for fun. I gotta tell you....it's been a blast. There are so many great functions on it that I don't even bother with (even tools to learn) because I'm too busy having fun just listening to music and banging along with it. I've also figured out that I can look up old Rock Band drum songs on youtube and follow along with these drums! Yowza! Definitely a stress buster and a whole lot of fun, even if you're feeling too old to start something new.

I have my drums set up on a wire rack with a towel folded under the back end to tip it forward. The wire rack allows me to have the drums at a comfortable height and also gives me a perfect place for my laptop to sit so I can follow along with those Rock Band videos.

PROS: No matter what your skill level (mine was really zero), you can play this right out of the box and have a lot of fun with it.

CONS: The pedals, as others have stated, are kind of a pain. If there was one thing I wish I could replace it would be the pedals. I'd love to be able to kick it without having it double tap or miss. It's just too touchy to do it right. I have found that I have better control by placing the pedal backwards and using my heel.

I take the time to write reviews because I know that I rely heavily on honest reviews when I make Amazon purchases. If my review was at all helpful to you, please let me know!



Yamaha DTX522K Customizable Electronic Drum Kit with 3-Zone Textured Silicone Snare Pad Review:


Researched a lot of drums before purchasing this kit. Have had this kit for almost 2 months now. Wanted to get back into playing again after a 20 year break. Not a professional drummer... just like to learn, play and have fun. Went with electric instead of acoustic because of the noise. This certainly meets that criteria. If you get an electric set... I recommend going with a good set of headphones. I went with Audio-Technica.. as this was recommended by many people I talked to. Also, I purchased a 4yr extended warranty through Asurion, offered at checkout, if you can afford it.. I would do it. Anyhow... here are just a few pros and cons I found with this set. Hope this helps...
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Pros:
- Many good sounding kits to select from. Sounds really good with headphones.
- Toms, cymbals, hardware all feel pretty durable.
- While playing... hitting the toms, cymbals and kick isn't annoyingly loud. (doesn't bother me with headphones on;)
- Able to add additional toms, cymbals or kick. Wasn't really sure how to do this at first. Took some time to figure out. I've added two (TP65) toms and will probably add an additional tom and cymbal. You can add a TOTAL of 4 toms, cymbals or kick. You can split the 3 tom inputs and there's an additional input in the kick. To do this you will need a mono cable and a L/R splitter to stereo cable, to split each tom. Once you add the new tom, there are instructions in the included book that tells you how to change the voice/sound of the tom/cymbal.
- I cast my tablet to my TV and watch/play along with uToob. I have the output speaker cable on the tv going to the module. So, I can listen, watch and play. Search drumless songs on uToob.. it's a blast.
This is a pro and a con... the kit is very compact, which is good for me... but, for someone tall... or accustom to playing an acoustic set, this may be an issue for them.
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Cons:
- After only playing for about 40hrs on the set... the kick stopped working. Actually.. it didn't completely stop, I just had to really stomp on the pedal to get the kick to trigger. Changed cables.. drum kits and still continued to have the issue. Because it's still under warranty... I called Yamaha customer service. They walked me through checking a couple other things.. but nothing worked. They said they would get another kick sent out. Ok... great. However.. they didn't tell me it's on back order for over a month. Ok.. so now what. Like I said.. I'm not in a band... I don't have any gigs coming up. But, I do have an $800 kit sitting in the basement that I would like to play. Not much fun playing without a kick. So, I'm going to order another kick. That way I'll have a back up when one or the other break.. I can keep playing while I'm waiting for a replacement.
- Ok.. next issue. Now the snare drum is starting to do the same thing. Again, it doesn't stop working all the time.. but it does stop working. I continue playing... probably another 10 hits.. then it works again. I think I'll wait until I have a kick to start playing again before I work on replacing the snare. I'll use one of the toms as a snare while I'm waiting for the replacement on that one.
- I don't think this set would suit the advanced player looking to get into an electric set. I would probably go with another brand or up in model numbers - if you have the money.
- Snare drum clamp/post that attaches to the frame does not stay in place. After a short time, I find the snare at a 45degree angle. I'll have to look into how I can keep the snare from rotating down. I'm not a hard hitter... the frame is just smooth.
- The kick moves away as you play/kick the pedal. I initially put a rug under the kit to help keep the kick from moving. It does have spikes that should keep the kick from moving... but, all this does is tear up the carpet. So, what I had to do is put down rug tape under the carpet -so the carpet doesn't move-, then I put a piece of 1/2" x 6" x 3' wood between the base legs and the kick. Looks hacky, but it does the job.
- The app they offer only works with apple. Plus you would need a pricey cord/adapter to use the app. Seems they would make an android app that is usb to micro. Maybe they'll have something down the road, if enough people ask for it.
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I was going to give it 3 stars because of the issue with the kick and snare, but I figure... the pros out way the cons for this set.
- 4 solid stars.
So, if you're looking for a mid range value electronic drum set... this would probably work for you.
That's my two cents on this set. Hope it helps.



Alesis Drums Nitro Mesh Kit | Eight Piece All Mesh Electronic Drum Kit With Super Solid Aluminum Rack, 385 Sounds, 60 Play Along Tracks, Connection Cables, Drum Sticks & Drum Key included Review:


First off I want to say that I bought these when they came with a fifty-dollar gift card to Amazon, so they really only cost $300. It also included one set of sticks and a drum key. I am writing this for two purposes...to critique them from an entry level set perspective, and their ability to work with a double bass.

From the double bass perspective, this kit's base pad is sufficient for double bass. The pad is louder when hit closer to the center. As long as the beater hits someplace on the pad it will work. Mine has about an inch of play room on the side of each beater. If I center them, they work perfect. It's only when they stray to the side that they are a little less loud. The pedal I chose does not fit very good as far as where it connects to the pad stand. To center the beaters, I have to move the peddle as far to the right as possible. It's not real secure when I do it this way, and end up having to adjust/tighten it every 15 minutes of use, but this pad was not designed with double bass in mind. I am an engineer and I can just design a better piece to weld on that will be much better. Since I can do the drawing and give it to a friend that welds and is great at manufacturing parts, it's only going to cost me the price of a piece of metal. I would imagine if you paid someone to do it, it would not be an inexpensive kit anymore. I would just buy a larger pad stand,if I didn't have the ability to make one for free. That being said, there are other ways you could do it without welding...you could get some metal, drill holes, and bolt it to the existing pad stand. Also, there might be other pedals that would center easier than mine. I chose the TAMA HP200PTW Iron Cobra 200 Double Pedal, https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B4XDWB6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_detailpage_o07_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and I am extremely happy with it. I had a DW pedal before, and it didn't come close to comparing with this one. I think the DW was a hundred dollars more than the Tama as well, but this was 15 years ago, and double pedals may have been more expensive then. The performance of the Tama is by far the best of any pedal I ever used, and there are other things you can add to the pedal to make it faster. The point of this before I go in too many directions, is the pad itself has plenty of room for two pedals to strike it in the "sweet spot", or close enough to the electronic trigger, to work perfectly. Finding a pedal that clamps on to the stand right might be a challenge; I don't know, this is the only pedal I tried with it.

My previous, and first electronic kit was a Roland brian with Hart Dynamics drums. They were the same price as the Roland drums, only I liked the way they played better, and they came with a lifetime warranty. I'm not sure how long ago, but they went out of business: so much for the lifetime warranty. I had the DW 3000 double bass pedal, which at the time cost about $300 (the cost of this entire kit), and now they cost $250...double bass is much more popular now than it was back then...my hypothesis why the pedal went down that much after 15 years. The point I am making here, is that I am comparing the Alesis kit to that kit...which was from 15 years ago when electronic drums were nowhere near as prevalent as they are now. I also had the same drum throne; I liked it so I got it again.

From the entry level perspective: here are the reasons I did not give the kit a 5. It doesn't come with a throne. Beginners might not think of that and be disappointed when it arrives and realize that they still need to order one. That can be a significant addition to the price of the kit. I found a throne I like for just under $60, Gibraltar 6608 Heavy Drum Throne. It's comfortable, functional, and sturdy. I am a big man (about 300 lbs). This is my second one. I had the first one 15 years and it never had a problem, and like I said, I weigh a lot. I purchased both the throne and Tama pedal from Amazon, and I love them both. I copied and pasted the names on Amazon if you want to check them out. This kit does come with a single bass pedal by the way, so you don't have to buy a different pedal. Some other things you will need are: A way to hear the kit - either headphones (the input jack is 3.5 mm), an amp., or a stereo to plug into. I also got some over the ear headphones (OneOdio) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N6ZJH96/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 that are amazing for $30. The other thing that is a must have from my perspective it a cable to attach your phone or mp3 player. You will need a 3.5mm to 3.5 mm cable to plug into the headphone jack of your phone or player...same size into the Alesis brain. Here is the one I got...I like long cords when playing drums...hate it when I move and a cord tugs on me. By the way, there is nothing bluetooth or wireless in this kit:. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KWR8OZ4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 The headphones I put a link for, also have a cord close to 10 feet, and a bunch of different ways and sizes to hook up that come with the headphones. I put all this extra stuff because if you are new to electronic kits, you might not think of it and be dissapointed when you have to rush out to buy headphones to hear them or a cord so you can hook up your mp3 player and play along to YOUR music. The kit does have some built in songs you can play with.

OK, so for the kit's performance. The cymbols scare me as they don't appear real sturdy, but work fine so far. The ride cymbal makes the bell sound when you hit it hard. I like using the bell, so I am wondering how long they will last. They work and sound great now. The only other kit I owned was Roland with drums the same quality. The mesh heads seem great. I get good bounce and they play like an acoustic drum head. The rim around the drum heads it high, and they take some getting used to. An 8" drum isn't a very big target to start with, and if you put a high ring around it...a bit challenging to say the least. The rims do make for easy, good sounding rim shots. All the pads are responsive with no delay. The stand is easy to put together, but this is my second one, and my friend that helped me works with me as an engineer. I would guess we can figure stuff like this out at least as good as the average person. Their assembly instructions suck, and if I didn't understand how these go together already, it would have been really hard to put together. All the drum sounds I have heard so far sounded great.

Now, like I said earlier, my previous kit was a Roland brain, and drums I think were at least as good as Roland. Roland is the standard in electronic drums...just my opinion. I got that kit 15 years ago. I am sure all drum kits have evolved since then. Comparing the Roland kit from 15 years ago with this one, I would say the actual drum pads are very similar, and play almost exactly the same. The stand is just as sturdy. The cymbols seem about the same, but the Rolands didn't need to be hit as hard to get the bell sound. Through headphones, the Alesis kit sounds almost exactly the same as the Roland did. I haven't checked all the Alesis brain can do, but I think it probably does more than the Roland (15 years old) did. I am sure the new Roland brains do way more now. I think drums are like cars. The Roland is like a Bentley. Sure, it's a nice car, but not that nice...In my opinion, a big part of it's price tag is the name Bentley. So sure, maybe my new kit is like a Chevy, but it gets me where I need to go, it's inexpensive to maintain and repair, and honestly, I think it looks a lot cooler than a Bentley. I have played drums on and off for almost 50 years. I have been away from it for 3 years, so I just wanted to check out an inexpensive kit for S and Gs, and I am glad I did. I don't know how long it will last, but for now I am very impressed. I would highly recommend this kit.

I wonder if anyone will read all this...lol



Gibraltar 6713E HD Double Braced Electronics Mounting Stand Review:


Holds my new Roland SPD30 stably with ease using the Gibraltar SC-EMMP Electronic Module Mounting Plate. I was even able to securely attach a full size Roland snare drum to the shaft using the Pearl PPS37 L Arm Rod with Adapter. Now I have a very mobile full featured electronic drum set combination that can easily fit the Octapad, foot pedals, sticks, cables and throne in a large suitcase - amazing! Just hold your lightweight 15 inch powered speaker in one hand and roll your suitcase with the other hand and your ready to go just about anywhere with ease. Youngsters don't know how good they have it these days. Save lots of money and get this instead of the overpriced Roland stand.



Alesis Drums Turbo Mesh Kit - Electronic Drum Kit With Mesh Heads, Super-Solid Aluminum Rack, 100+ Sounds, 30 Play-Along Tracks, Drum Sticks, Connection Cables, & Drum Key included. Review:


First off I want to say that I bought these when they came with a fifty-dollar gift card to Amazon, so they really only cost $300. It also included one set of sticks and a drum key. I am writing this for two purposes...to critique them from an entry level set perspective, and their ability to work with a double bass.

From the double bass perspective, this kit's base pad is sufficient for double bass. The pad is louder when hit closer to the center. As long as the beater hits someplace on the pad it will work. Mine has about an inch of play room on the side of each beater. If I center them, they work perfect. It's only when they stray to the side that they are a little less loud. The pedal I chose does not fit very good as far as where it connects to the pad stand. To center the beaters, I have to move the peddle as far to the right as possible. It's not real secure when I do it this way, and end up having to adjust/tighten it every 15 minutes of use, but this pad was not designed with double bass in mind. I am an engineer and I can just design a better piece to weld on that will be much better. Since I can do the drawing and give it to a friend that welds and is great at manufacturing parts, it's only going to cost me the price of a piece of metal. I would imagine if you paid someone to do it, it would not be an inexpensive kit anymore. I would just buy a larger pad stand,if I didn't have the ability to make one for free. That being said, there are other ways you could do it without welding...you could get some metal, drill holes, and bolt it to the existing pad stand. Also, there might be other pedals that would center easier than mine. I chose the TAMA HP200PTW Iron Cobra 200 Double Pedal, https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B4XDWB6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_detailpage_o07_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and I am extremely happy with it. I had a DW pedal before, and it didn't come close to comparing with this one. I think the DW was a hundred dollars more than the Tama as well, but this was 15 years ago, and double pedals may have been more expensive then. The performance of the Tama is by far the best of any pedal I ever used, and there are other things you can add to the pedal to make it faster. The point of this before I go in too many directions, is the pad itself has plenty of room for two pedals to strike it in the "sweet spot", or close enough to the electronic trigger, to work perfectly. Finding a pedal that clamps on to the stand right might be a challenge; I don't know, this is the only pedal I tried with it.

My previous, and first electronic kit was a Roland brian with Hart Dynamics drums. They were the same price as the Roland drums, only I liked the way they played better, and they came with a lifetime warranty. I'm not sure how long ago, but they went out of business: so much for the lifetime warranty. I had the DW 3000 double bass pedal, which at the time cost about $300 (the cost of this entire kit), and now they cost $250...double bass is much more popular now than it was back then...my hypothesis why the pedal went down that much after 15 years. The point I am making here, is that I am comparing the Alesis kit to that kit...which was from 15 years ago when electronic drums were nowhere near as prevalent as they are now. I also had the same drum throne; I liked it so I got it again.

From the entry level perspective: here are the reasons I did not give the kit a 5. It doesn't come with a throne. Beginners might not think of that and be disappointed when it arrives and realize that they still need to order one. That can be a significant addition to the price of the kit. I found a throne I like for just under $60, Gibraltar 6608 Heavy Drum Throne. It's comfortable, functional, and sturdy. I am a big man (about 300 lbs). This is my second one. I had the first one 15 years and it never had a problem, and like I said, I weigh a lot. I purchased both the throne and Tama pedal from Amazon, and I love them both. I copied and pasted the names on Amazon if you want to check them out. This kit does come with a single bass pedal by the way, so you don't have to buy a different pedal. Some other things you will need are: A way to hear the kit - either headphones (the input jack is 3.5 mm), an amp., or a stereo to plug into. I also got some over the ear headphones (OneOdio) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N6ZJH96/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 that are amazing for $30. The other thing that is a must have from my perspective it a cable to attach your phone or mp3 player. You will need a 3.5mm to 3.5 mm cable to plug into the headphone jack of your phone or player...same size into the Alesis brain. Here is the one I got...I like long cords when playing drums...hate it when I move and a cord tugs on me. By the way, there is nothing bluetooth or wireless in this kit:. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KWR8OZ4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 The headphones I put a link for, also have a cord close to 10 feet, and a bunch of different ways and sizes to hook up that come with the headphones. I put all this extra stuff because if you are new to electronic kits, you might not think of it and be dissapointed when you have to rush out to buy headphones to hear them or a cord so you can hook up your mp3 player and play along to YOUR music. The kit does have some built in songs you can play with.

OK, so for the kit's performance. The cymbols scare me as they don't appear real sturdy, but work fine so far. The ride cymbal makes the bell sound when you hit it hard. I like using the bell, so I am wondering how long they will last. They work and sound great now. The only other kit I owned was Roland with drums the same quality. The mesh heads seem great. I get good bounce and they play like an acoustic drum head. The rim around the drum heads it high, and they take some getting used to. An 8" drum isn't a very big target to start with, and if you put a high ring around it...a bit challenging to say the least. The rims do make for easy, good sounding rim shots. All the pads are responsive with no delay. The stand is easy to put together, but this is my second one, and my friend that helped me works with me as an engineer. I would guess we can figure stuff like this out at least as good as the average person. Their assembly instructions suck, and if I didn't understand how these go together already, it would have been really hard to put together. All the drum sounds I have heard so far sounded great.

Now, like I said earlier, my previous kit was a Roland brain, and drums I think were at least as good as Roland. Roland is the standard in electronic drums...just my opinion. I got that kit 15 years ago. I am sure all drum kits have evolved since then. Comparing the Roland kit from 15 years ago with this one, I would say the actual drum pads are very similar, and play almost exactly the same. The stand is just as sturdy. The cymbols seem about the same, but the Rolands didn't need to be hit as hard to get the bell sound. Through headphones, the Alesis kit sounds almost exactly the same as the Roland did. I haven't checked all the Alesis brain can do, but I think it probably does more than the Roland (15 years old) did. I am sure the new Roland brains do way more now. I think drums are like cars. The Roland is like a Bentley. Sure, it's a nice car, but not that nice...In my opinion, a big part of it's price tag is the name Bentley. So sure, maybe my new kit is like a Chevy, but it gets me where I need to go, it's inexpensive to maintain and repair, and honestly, I think it looks a lot cooler than a Bentley. I have played drums on and off for almost 50 years. I have been away from it for 3 years, so I just wanted to check out an inexpensive kit for S and Gs, and I am glad I did. I don't know how long it will last, but for now I am very impressed. I would highly recommend this kit.

I wonder if anyone will read all this...lol



Alesis Nitro Mesh Electronic Drum Kit With a Pair of Drum Sticks + Samson SR350 Headphones + Hosa 3.5 mm Interconnect Cable, 10 feet - Deluxe Accessory Bundle Review:


Just a basic set with three toms and a snare. A hi hat, one crash and a ride. You can pay more to have a set with an extra Tom and crash if you are a more experienced player, but if you are just starting out, this one is perfect. The sound is clean, and can be heard through headphones, guitar amplifiers and so on. I wasn’t expecting much to be honest but I was pretty blown away with the accuracy and sound changes depending on how much contact you make. You can use the rim of the snare as well for a different sound like a real set. Overall a nice little electric set, that wasn’t difficult to put together. Will also make the family happy, because they will barely hear a thing when headphones are used.



BABY JOY Electronic Roll Up Drum Kit w/ 9 Electric Drum Pads, 3.7V Lithium Battery, Bluetooth, Record, Play, Volume & Rate Control, MP3 Headphone Input, Foot Pedal, Drumsticks, 20 Hours Duration Review:


As a Drummer of many many years. My Youngest Son wanted a set. But home is too small. Comes with all the bells and whistles to give him the stuff he needs to find out if he actually wants to play. I suggest to try this for your youth or something just to practice on as a Drummer. Haven't hear any complaints yet. My Son likes it so that is all that matters.



Carlsbro CSD130 Electronic Drum Set with Realistic Kick Pedal Review:


I am very pleased so far with this drum kit. Everyone needs to remember the price of this kit..... 300 bucks! Dont expect miracles. For the price, you are getting some features that are not on similar kits in this price range. One is the Midi outputs, another is the usb connection. The look and feel of this kit is far better than expected. The pads have a nice rubber padding, smooth and silky feel, better than some of those sticky pads ive played on before. I love the compact-portability of these drums. So simple and easy to set up-tear down, that I cant believe I didnt go this route decades ago. Nothing worse than loading-unloading a big acoustic kit and hardware,mic placement, sound checks. With this electric kit, I litteraly fit the whole thing in one half of the back seat of a corrolla!. As far as sounds go, it is what iit is. You can customize 10 of your own kits which is cool. It also has a sensitivity feature that makes it feel - sound more realistic. I am using this kit to play live in the very near future, and have no doubt it will perform great. I plan on purchasing a second one of these to have as a backup, because for the price of a Roland TD4pk, you can have 2 of these. The only negative, is you have to assemble the kick pedal with the trigger unit. It is more of an adjustment issue with the beater,other than that, im very happy so far.