Best Planter Nursery Pots in 2020



Mkono 6.5 Inch Plastic Planters Indoor Set of 5 Flower Plant Pots Modern Decorative Gardening Pot with Drainage for All House Plants, Flowers, Herbs, African Violets, Foliage Plants, Cream White Review:


These are great! I will say they are slightly bigger than I was expecting. They are 6 1/2 inches wide and 6 inches tall.
Other than that, they are a nice thick plastic. The inside of it is really smooth and has almost a glossy finish and the outside is more of a matte finish. I was a little worried that it would get dirty easily but when I put my plants in them and had dirt everywhere the dirt came right off so I was happy with that. I also like that they include the option to fill the drainage hole. Overall, super happy with them. I do wish they were maybe an inch thinner but that's ok.



Mkono 5.5 Inch Plastic Planters Indoor Set of 5 Flower Plant Pots Modern Decorative Gardening Pot with Drainage for All House Plants, Flowers, African Violets, Cream White Review:


These are great! I will say they are slightly bigger than I was expecting. They are 6 1/2 inches wide and 6 inches tall.
Other than that, they are a nice thick plastic. The inside of it is really smooth and has almost a glossy finish and the outside is more of a matte finish. I was a little worried that it would get dirty easily but when I put my plants in them and had dirt everywhere the dirt came right off so I was happy with that. I also like that they include the option to fill the drainage hole. Overall, super happy with them. I do wish they were maybe an inch thinner but that's ok.



Viagrow 2 Gal. Plastic Nursery Pots (7.57 liters) 10-Pack Review:


These arrived in great condition. I'm currently running a long-term gardening experiment and I'm trying to grow lemon trees from home using seeds from fruit I purchased at the store -- so far with great success! I transferred my saplings to these containers after they outgrew their previous ones and these are very sturdy. The only different in mine compared to the ones pictures is that mine did not have the plated sides - mine were smooth all the way around like a plastic party cup. Regardless, they still worked great and aren't too large either which is nice. I would recommend these pots. Blessings!



KINGLAKE 8 Pcs 4" Plastic Plant Flower Seedlings Nursery Pot/Pots Planter Colorful Flower Plant Container Seed Starting Pots with Pallet,8 Colors Review:


I bought these to have color-coded containers of microgreen trials, before deciding which type of seeds to get more of. So far, they are working fine. There were just a couple of small spots that needed a bit of sanding with an old nail file.

I'm not really planting the seeds, but growing them hydroponically. I first put some seed in the bottom of a pot, maybe 1/3 to 2/5 the amount needed to cover the bottom. Then I will have to soak the seed thoroughly. The amount of time thisvtakes depends on hough tough thr seed's outer layer is, When I get around to trying sunflowers, I'll be using that old nail file to make some thinner places on the edges of the seeds. If instead the seeds a very thin nd would fall through the drainage slots in the pot, I will have to first put a few layers of paper tissue or a layer of paper towel in the pot before adding the soaked seeds,
Then I covered the top of the pot with plastic to keep the moisture in, plus use a misting bottle as well. I'll need to mist at intervls that depend on the relative humidity in the room. Once the seeds germinate, I may need to add some liquid fertilizer to the misting bottle. By the time the sprouts are about 2" tall, I'll taste a few to see if they're ready or not.



TRUEDAYS 4" Plastic Flower Seedlings Nursery Pot/pots, 100 Pack Review:


Great little starter pots. Soft enough to easily remove plants ready for transplant, and strong enough to be cleaned and used again. I have some that have been reused a few times already. They take permanent marker really well so you can get a definite label on them. I cut one apart to make small tags that I tie onto my plants.

This is the best way to keep track of plants that will be transplanted at least once: Use a hole puncher to get a hole in your tags, then use string to tie the tag to a low branch. The tag will always hang low, out of the way, easy to find, off the soil, and if you know how to tie a good knot then you'll never lose track of your plants.

If I have some to spare, I like to cut a little piece of agfabric to place on the bottom of my pots before filling with soil to prevent soil spilling everywhere. I also like to line the sides of pots with agfabric to promote air movement and water drainage, and this lining will assist with removal for transplanting too. (For my production plants, I am switching entirely to fabric pots.)

These pots have small holes in the bottom for good drainage, but I wonder if it's possible to spill less soil with narrower slits instead of round holes. I would also like them to be available at fewer quantities; I think I had to buy 100. Since I reuse almost everything I have, it will take a while for me to need all 100 of them, but it does make it easier to give starts and clones away to friends.



Pro Cal HGPK1PHD Premium Nursery Pot 1 Gal (20/pk) Review:


This year I've decided to give growing a vegetable garden a shot. I could have started a small patch in my backyard but I wanted to start small - who knows how this is going to work out. I went to a few big name stores and, although they have cheap-looking planters all around their garden section, they do not sell them! (??) So I resorted to Amazon to find them. Well after looking for a while, I decided to get the good quality kind instead of the cheap ones so that they could last me more than a season if it turns out I'm not half-bad at this. The pots arrived in a tarp-looking sturdy bag and they feel like they are heavy duty. They have holes at the bottom for drainage, which I learned is important. They are the perfect size for a tomato plant. I planted mostly tomatoes and strawberries, with also an attempt at growing peas, zucchini and herbs. I like the fact that I can move these anywhere if they get in the way and I am really happy with the quality of these planters. I recommend them highly!!



Viagrow Nursery Pots, 1/2 gallon - pallet ( .62 gal / 2.5qts / 2.37 Liters) Review:


I needed inexpensive plastic nursery pots for my moringa seedlings. The cheapest one that fit my needs from a local home improvement store was 98 cents each before tax. A similar pot from a local gardening supply store was 41 cents each before tax. After having purchased 15 pots from the aforementioned gardening supply store for immediate use, I continued to look elsewhere for a cheaper price because I needed a lot more. A search on Amazon led me to the Viagrow 2.37-Liter Plastic Nursery Pots. Pre-tax, these pots are 28 cents each when purchased per 100-pack. I placed the order and two days later, the pots were in my front door.

Based on the comments, I was a bit worried that the Viagrow pots may be too thin and fragile. However, after receiving them, I was happy to find out that they fit my requirements perfectly. While these pots are not thick and heavy duty compared to others, I was able to crumple one multiple times and easily return it back to its original shape. There were crumple marks but the pot remained usable. See included photos of a crumpled pot and what it looks like after it was restored. They also do not tear easily and at 28 cents each before tax, they are a bargain in my opinion. I have already purchased my second 100-pack and have used 105 pots far. While I would not describe these as heavy duty, they do hold up to a good beating and still remain usable. There are also 9 holes at the bottom for ample drainage.

Pros
- Inexpensive
- Does not tear easily
- Excellent drainage
- Reusable

Cons
- None

If you’re a casual gardener and don’t require the heavy duty ones that do not bend, then consider the Viagrow nursery pots. For the price, it’s hard to find similar pots that is better in quality and cheaper in price. I will definitely be purchasing more and reuse them for as long as possible.

Do take a look at the included photos for actual measurements and crumple test results. These are customer photos I wished were available for other Amazon shoppers during my research.



Augshy 110 Pcs 4" Plastic Plants Nursery Pot,Seed Starting Pots Review:


I bought these pots for my seedlings. Of course 110 pcs at great value price you couldn't pass up on the offer. I did review the comments and such - I was expecting to get at least 2-3 damage, but my order actually had 10 pots damaged. You get what you pay for... that was the disappointing experience about my order.

Other than that, I knew the pots were going to be lightweight and thin but I'm only using them for seedling germination so that works out fine. The pots that are fine are doing their job for my plants. Durability, I think they will last for quite a few repotting sessions.



YIKUSH 4 Inch 100 Packs Plants Nursery Pots Reusable Plant Seeding Nursery Pot Review:


I love this little pots, they helped me pot a few handfuls of seedlings I found in my yard. If you are looking for a nursery pot you can use to pot your seedlings until you are ready to re-pot or transplant and a nursery pot to re-use, this is your nursery pot. If you are looking for a pot that you will be able to sink into a tub of soil to fill before potting your babies, this is not your nursery pot; the material is not sturdy enough for that purpose. These nursery pots have served my purpose and I have already reordered.



KINGLAKE 50 Pcs 6" Plastic Plants Nursery Seedlings Pot/Pots Flower Plant Container Seed Starting Pots Review:


These are terrific potting containers. I use them to transplant individual tomato, pepper and eggplant seedlings to a larger container from their original container. Don't let their initial feel worry you (they seem a bit "thin" at first touch but it's to their favor, not against it). They are somewhat flexible and incredibly strong and give a lot of room for root growth. I've spent twice as much for other containers that become brittle and crack easily after one season. I can rinse these out and use them over and over. And, if I end up giving away a bunch of plants (as I am wont to do since I tend to over-plant my seedlings and end up with hundred's of extra plants....fellow crazy gardeners will understand this), it's inexpensive to replace them. I've ordered another round this year and will again next year,as well.