Best Mirrorless Cameras in 2020



Sony Alpha a6000 Mirrorless Camera with 16-50mm and 55-210mm Lenses Bundle (10 Items) Review:


This bundle has most everything you need to get started, and then some. There are scores of reviews for the camera itself, so I don't need to rehash too much of that. It is a magnificent camera. The smaller body of the mirrorless camera makes a huge difference when traveling. It's simple enough for a beginner, but has all the features for the expert. Two issues that I discovered immediately were first that the lens cap has no retaining leash, so it is destined to be lost unless you buy one, and the neck strap feels like coarse sand paper. I immediately replaced it with the strap from my old camera. The mini tripod included in the bundle is way too bulky for its height. I'll never use it. I have a much more compact mini tripod which fits easily into my camera bag, and speaking of camera bags, the one included in the kit is too big for my taste. I like to travel light and a considerably smaller bag can fit the camera, 2nd lens, tripod and more. The bigger bag is still nice, but I just prefer being as compact as possible. If you're considering this camera, and you absolutely should, this is a very nice bundle, even if there are some bits you may not need.



Sony Alpha a6400 Mirrorless Camera: Compact APS-C Interchangeable Lens Digital Camera with Real-Time Eye Auto Focus, 4K Video, Flip Screen & 16-50mm Lens - E Mount Compatible Cameras - ILCE-6400L/B Review:


This camera is definitely an upgrade from my a6000. But that was not my reason to buy it. I was considering the FDR-AX700 camcorder but when I saw the video recording capabilities of the a6400, it seemed like the right choice, mainly because it is much less expensive than the AX700 and smaller.

But what really convinced me was that it does not shut down after only a few minutes of recording as the other alpha models and it has no recording lenght limit.

Other great new features are the upgraded eye autofocus and the ability to power it directly via the micro USB port.

Finally, image quality is deffinuteky better than the a6000. I can finally use ISO higher than 1600 knowing my images will look good.

And lastly, I really like the silent shutter. It is something I really need sometimes snd now I have it.



Sony Alpha ILCE-6000L/B a6000 Digital Camera with 16-50mm Lens Bundle with Accessory Bundle (Black) Review:


Camera: MUCH MUCH MUCH better quality photos than my Canon 12mp (and I am a Canon person through and through). This is going to be my go-to camera for wedding photography from now on due to the great low-light photos that it produces. With the base lens included, there is not much zoom, but if I have to crop a photo, there is not much loss of quality at all due to the camera's 24mp sensor. Being mirrorless, the camera takes photos faster than lightning and focuses quicker than any other camera I've ever owned or used. This is *VITAL* for wedding photos. The quality is amazing. Large photos. I shoot in RAW and edit with Corel PaintShop Pro. Low profile, lightweight (more lightweight than my Canon, that's for sure!) so this is great to carry around. Takes fabulous pictures in all the settings I've used (I've tried all of them). I'm totally sold! Will probably be buying a telephoto lens to go with my kit of goodies that came with the camera - including the extra batteries which you will need if you get this - the battery lasting power is not bad, but it's not great and you WILL need two batteries for a typical wedding ceremony and photos afterward...maybe an additional for the reception. Take along the included battery charger!



PANASONIC LUMIX G7 4K Digital Mirrorless Camera Bundle with LUMIX G Vario 14-42mm and 45-150mm Lenses, 16MP, 3-Inch Touch LCD, DMC-G7WK (USA Black) Review:


What a camera you're getting for this price point! The Panasonic G7 is the sixth camera in their G series line, and I have to say they have finally nailed it. This camera sits right in the sweet spot of performance, size, and price. It is considered a mid level camera but can do just about anything the higher end models can.
The 16 mp sensor has been refined and provide good high iso performance. RAW files are easy to work with. The headline feature 4K video is top notch although you have limited manual controls for video recording. Speaking of controls, this camera bristles with dials, levers, and buttons. It is a call back to the original G1 and G2 and I love it. Handling is top notch, everything falls into place and all functions are within easy reach for fast access. The grip is superb and I really think this is the best handling camera out there. Auto focus is fast and accurate, but that also depends on the lens.
So what's not to like? Not much. The build materials are plastic, but overall build quality is quite good. No in body stabilization, this is a big deal to some. I don't know why, I don't think it is such a big deal. No weather sealing but we are talking about a mid level camera here, if you want to check all the boxes you will be looking at a more expensive camera. Saying that though Pentax manages to weather seal all their bodies so it can be done Panasonic!
Overall, for this price point it is tough to find a better camera. Highly recommended! Use the money you save to get some lenses. Because as good a camera body is, it's really the lens that makes the biggest difference. I see a lot of people upgrading to a new camera expecting to be blown away, but always end up disappointed. Simply because they just use the kit lenses the cameras come with.
If you couldn't tell I really like this camera. I'm a portrait photographer and you can see a lot of my work on Flickr. Just search my name I guess. Happy shooting!



Sony Alpha a6000 Mirrorless Digital Camera 24.3MP SLR Camera with 3.0-Inch LCD (Black) w/16-50mm Power Zoom Lens Review:


I am a pro and yes this is good enough for any professional work you can throw at it. To qualify myself, I have a successful photography business and I have been in the industry since I was 16 years old. I am now 32. I have shot every level of camera there is and 4 bad Nikons in a row pointed me towards the mirrorless revolution. I have owned many mirrorless cameras from Olympus, Fuji, and Sony. Let me say my Sony mirrorless cameras are my dream system. I finally have lost my gear acquisition syndrome. I currently shoot weddings, family portraits, and commercial work with the A7 and the A6000. I owned but sold the A7ii. To get it out of the way, I get asked all the time but don't you miss the speed of your Nikons? The answer is no! If you can't shoot a bride walking down the isle with these very quick cameras, a Nikon isn't going to save you from your lack of skill. You should not be experimenting with someone's most important memories of you can't work with these cameras. I have thrown every difficult lighting situation at these cameras and they have never let me down. Now to the A6000. There is currently no better camera for the money right now. For under $500 you can get one of the best performing cameras focus wise. The images are impeccably sharp and unlike Nikon, there are never any back focus issues and I have no trouble nailing the shot on the first time every time. The grain structure is wonderful and I never have any issues shooting at ISO 6400. That being said, I come from the film days and have no trouble with a little grain. I am not a noise snob and to those who are you are losing out on some wonderful personality in your images by not pushing the ISO boundaries. To those who are full frame snobs, I can get amazing bokeh out of the A6000 especially when paired with my Zeiss 55. I no longer have to kill my back with heavy gear and electronic EVFs are a revelation. No more chimping because I get to adjust my shot in real time. Take it from someone who has spent way too much on gear in the past in search for the dream system. You do not have to go broke to get unreal results. This camera will never let you down especially if you know what you are doing. If you don't know what you are doing, this camera is very forgiving. Happy shooting and hope this review helps.



Panasonic DMC-G7KS Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera 14-42 mm Lens Kit, 4K Review:


What a camera you're getting for this price point! The Panasonic G7 is the sixth camera in their G series line, and I have to say they have finally nailed it. This camera sits right in the sweet spot of performance, size, and price. It is considered a mid level camera but can do just about anything the higher end models can.
The 16 mp sensor has been refined and provide good high iso performance. RAW files are easy to work with. The headline feature 4K video is top notch although you have limited manual controls for video recording. Speaking of controls, this camera bristles with dials, levers, and buttons. It is a call back to the original G1 and G2 and I love it. Handling is top notch, everything falls into place and all functions are within easy reach for fast access. The grip is superb and I really think this is the best handling camera out there. Auto focus is fast and accurate, but that also depends on the lens.
So what's not to like? Not much. The build materials are plastic, but overall build quality is quite good. No in body stabilization, this is a big deal to some. I don't know why, I don't think it is such a big deal. No weather sealing but we are talking about a mid level camera here, if you want to check all the boxes you will be looking at a more expensive camera. Saying that though Pentax manages to weather seal all their bodies so it can be done Panasonic!
Overall, for this price point it is tough to find a better camera. Highly recommended! Use the money you save to get some lenses. Because as good a camera body is, it's really the lens that makes the biggest difference. I see a lot of people upgrading to a new camera expecting to be blown away, but always end up disappointed. Simply because they just use the kit lenses the cameras come with.
If you couldn't tell I really like this camera. I'm a portrait photographer and you can see a lot of my work on Flickr. Just search my name I guess. Happy shooting!



PANASONIC LUMIX G7 4K Digital Camera, with LUMIX G VARIO 14-42mm MEGA O.I.S. Lens, 16 Megapixel Mirrorless Camera, 3-Inch LCD, DMC-G7KK (Black) Review:


I absolutely love this camera. I did hours and hours of research before spending this much money on a SLR/DSLR camera, and hands down this camera came up as the best choice. It has all the features and quality of cameras that cost twice as much. It's also a perfect starter camera for someone looking to get into more serious photography. I would reccomend looking up some Youtube videos and reviews on this camera to see all the features and quality before purchasing this one, or any higher end camera for that matter. HOWEVER, keep in mind, that many reviews are done by camera critics who rate this camera and others by extremely high standards, so they are going to knock this camera for having "problems" that the average person will never notice. The ONLY thing I agree with them that I could even notice as being an issue with this camera is that the auto focus is a little sluggish.. but if you are wanting to get into professional photography, you are going to have to learn how to focus your shots by yourself. Well there are two things, the second thing is that I had some difficulty setting up the wifi connection to my PC, but the connection to my phone through the app was super simple and quick. Besides that.. I ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!!



Canon EOS M50 Mirrorless Camera Kit w/EF-M15-45mm and 4K Video - Black Review:


I'm not a fan of buying something because it is new. I am a fan of buying things that solve problems. The problem I'm having is that I'm getting older and my heavy DSLR and long Canon "L" lenses were getting too heavy to cart around all day. So I made a list of Must have and Nice to have items.

Must have: small, lightweight, interchangeable lenses (and a variety to choose from), fully articulated LCD, near zero shutter lag, raw processing, 8 shot buffer minimum, high ISO, viewfinder (with visible histogram), hot shoe.

Nice to have: wireless remote, iOS app, GPS.

This camera has all the items on both lists. (The GPS requires connection to a phone, and that drains the battery on both, so I probably won't use it much)

Then there are some unexpected bonuses. One is that Canon introduced a new raw format called CR3. It is highly compressed and lossless, so it will save considerable disk space. This is getting important with >20Mpixels on modern sensors (24 here, IIRC). The camera came out March 26. Adobe updated its software April 3 to handle it.

You'll get a lot of opinion on what make a camera a professional's camera. Non-photographers judge by bulk, and that's just stereotype. To me, a professional camera has better weather sealing, multiple memory cards and a large buffer (transfers image to the card). It would also have a bigger offset between the tripod screw and the battery cover. (So the battery could be changed easily without removing the tripod or plate.

As for full frame, it doesn't matter. Imagine an 8x12 picture, perhaps from a magazine. Then put a mat on it where the sides are 1 inch thick. The part of the picture you see now is 6x10. That's what a 1.6 crop sensor does (in round numbers). The part of the image you see is completely unchanged. If the lens manufacturers just changed the numbers on the lens itself, no one would ever know. A lens marked 10mm becomes 16mm, but all else is the same. If you like the fisheye look, then you have to go full frame, but for pretty much anything else it doesn't matter.

As for video, that's a matter of the buffer. Shooting at 30 frames a second means filling the buffer fast (just hold the shutter button down on the camera you have now and see how fast it fills). To make continuous images for video, any camera has to crop the image before even sending it to the buffer and then the card. So video means a tighter crop. Again, a pro might want a more video capable camera .

The only glitch I ran into was with a third party lens from Tokina. The new software in the camera didn't talk to the software in the lens, and so it generated an error message about the connectors not being clean. After returning the first lens and getting a second with the same problem I called Tokina and they told me about the mismatch. They said that they're working on a firmware ujpgrade that will require me sending in the lens, but they had no due date on the fix. (I sent it back). If you're considering a lens from them or any 3rd party, I suggest giving them a call first. When they fix it I'll buy the lens again and update this review.

EDITED TO ADD:

1. Thing I miss the most: Port for wired remote shutter release. Yes, the smartphone app does the job but it burns the battery. Also, no way to take time lapse, which uses an intervalometer (and that feature isn't in the app, even if battery wasn't a problem)

2. This Arca-Swiss compatible plate fits the camera and still leaves room to access the battery compartment. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XK2790Y/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1



Sony a5100 16-50mm Interchangeable Lens Camera with 3-Inch Flip Up LCD (Black) Review:


I bought the Sony A5100 because I am a Youtuber and I wanted to get into Vlogging. As well take awesome photos for my Facebook and Instagram without carrying my heavy DSLR. I consider the A5100 because of the mirror flip up screen. As you know beauty bloggers are professional selfie takers lol. The flip up screen allows me to make sure the lighting, angles and the focus is right.A huge addition was that the camera came with WiFi, which means I can send videos or photos taken with this camera to any device around me as long as i'm on WiFi. which makes posting content on my social media so much easier and efficient. This particular point and shoot has some weight on it due to the lens it comes with. It's heavy enough to where it wont fall out of your hand but not heavy enough to where it will make your arms tired. I LOVE CANON products and buying a Sony was extreamlly hard for me but I am very happy with my purchase.



Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B) Review:


If you’ve come here you already know what most of the world knows: Sony makes class-leading image sensors and very good cameras.

I upgraded from the Sony A7R III.

Was it worth it? Maybe.

Is it worth upgrading from a Sony A7 III? No, wait to see what the A7 IV is like!

If you’re coming from almost any other Sony A7-series camera (except the S series which Sony seems to not care about anymore, which is sad), this is definitely worth a serious look.

I’m going to review this mainly from the perspective of someone coming from the A7R III.

What’s better (in order of importance):
- Ergonomics: the new grip has to be held to be believed! The camera feels so much more secure when shooting one-handed. Another bonus: many of the other buttons are noticeably taller and clickier. This makes the camera WAY EASIER to operate with big gloves on. Since I live in Alaska, this is HUGE for my use cases. I also broke the card door on my A7R III because I looked at it wrong. The card door here has been re-engineer to be much more durable and rugged. I also love that you can lock the exposure compensation dial. Something I never realized I needed till I had it.
- The EVF: it’s way sharper. It looks more real than real life. EVF’s are finally starting to approach OVF’s in visual fidelity. It’s impressive. It’s a joy to review photos you’ve already taken on it. Warning: do this in public and people will think you’re a creeper.
- Weather sealing: personally, I didn’t have issues shooting with even the old A7R II in the rain and snow. However, many people did. The seals on this are better than any A7 camera before it. Just make sure your lens is also sealed!
- Auto-focus: this is something that’s hard to objectively test, but the tracking does seem snappier. Also, it can do eye-AF during video now, which is incredible if you like to interview people at big apertures.
- DUAL UHS-II card slots: FINALLY! On the III, one of the card slots is gimped to UHS-I speeds. What this means is: if you want to shoot redundantly (write the photo to both cards) you bottleneck your entire camera to the speed of the slower slot. To get around this, I just designated the slow slot as video-only.
- The USB-C port is much faster for DATA transfer: transferring files directly from the camera is now a reality, the USB-C dream has (almost: more on that below) come true. (EDIT: update, apparently only on Sony's software. Imports to Lightroom are still very slow. I still recommend using a card reader)
- Detail: there is noticeably more detail in this sensor, if you shoot it right. There are LOTS of caveats though (see below)

What’s the same:
- Battery: same battery as the last model, and as the A7 III. This means if you bought some extras and are upgrading, you are ready to roll! It has a slightly higher total shots rating in this camera, but it’s probably not worth getting too excited about.
- File burden: while these files are definitely bigger, editing them in Lightroom doesn’t feel any more sluggish than the files from the III version. Don’t believe the hype. (my computer: 2016 15” Macbook Pro) My recommended work flow: shoot uncompressed RAW. When you import them into Lightroom, convert them to .DNG. This will give you a losslessly compressed RAW file.
- Noise: if you resize both images to the same size, noise is very close.
- Dynamic Range: hard to test objectively, but “feels” similar in character to the III version. (Sony quotes both at 15 stops)
- Menu system: it’s still Sony, it’s still bad. Luckily the camera is still absurdly customizable so once you get it setup, you won’t have to wade into them very often.
- USB-C port for charging speed: you can still charge it via USB-C and it’s still really slow. I’m not sure what the wattage is, but given that Sony says the micro-USB port charges at the same speed, I’d guess it’s around 10W. USB-C can go all the way up to 100W. I’m not asking for that much, but 30W would make a meaningful difference.
- Video quality: still no 10-bit video or 4k/60fps in a brand new 2019 camera is shameful. The last 3 iPhones have been able to do the latter. Sony says this can do “HDR” video, but it’s a marketing lie. There is no such thing as 8-bit HDR anymore than there is single-speaker “stereo” sound. The phrase makes no sense. It’s especially painful with the S-version getting left behind at version II.

What’s worse:
- Still no lossless RAW compression: c’mon Sony! The only RAW options are lossy compressed RAW (good 99% of the time, but I’m often in the 1%: astrophotography) and completely uncompressed RAW (massive files). I’ve found a work-around (see the same segment above), but it would be nice to not have to do this. This is one area where Canon/Nikon are way better. They have had lossless RAW compression for at least a decade!
- Detail: yep, it’s also a negative. To wring all that extra detail out of the sensor, you’re going to need:
o Good lenses: they’ve been warning us about this for years, and for years it’s been just that: an empty warning. It actually makes a difference for this sensor. I’d recommend moderately-priced primes or expensive (f/2.8) zooms.
o Fast shutter speeds: to hand-hold, I’d recommend at LEAST 1/3*focal length shutter speed to guarantee a sharp photo. So if you’re shooting at 100mm, that would mean 1/300th s. It sounds absurd but, if you like to zoom into 100% on your photos, you’ll notice some detail blurring as you push it closer to the old school 1/focal length rule. The other option is to lug a tripod.
o Low ISO’s: as you get further above ISO 100, the difference in detail rendered between this and the A7R III sensor starts to vanish. Once you’re in the 3200 range, the noise to detail ratio looks about the same.
- Noise: what, this is also a negative? If you view these files at 100% and view the A7R III files at 100%, this camera will look noisier. The advantage is when you scale it down to the size of the A7R III, the noise looks similar. (or, conversely, if you were to upscale the A7R III files to the size of the IV files)

One more thing: the multi-shot modes for more detail are still very clunky. I was testing them out by shooting a mountain against a blue sky, and I always got weird cross-hatching visual artifacts. Sony's software needs to be able to compensate for minor movement. (I was on a tripod with a 2-second timer and they still got artifacts when merged)

Overall thoughts: a great body. The ergonomics are the most impressive thing about this camera. They are rolling out the same body to the A9 II (announced today) and I’d expect the A7 IV will also have this body.

If you use good glass and have great technique, or you like to shoot at f/8.0 on a tripod, there is a meaningful improvement in image detail. At its worst, the detail is the same as the III. Which, to be fair, is still very impressive.

I know this doesn’t matter for most people, who will be buying this for stills-only, but the lack of 10-bit or 4k/60 really hurts. I’d love to not have to carry a second camera for video on mountaineering adventures. My theory for this is that Sony’s sensor designs are outgrowing their SoC/CPU designs.