Best Graphics Card Fans in 2020



inRobert 75mm GA81S2U DC 12V 0.38A 4Pin Cooler Fan Video Card Fan Replacement for Zotac GTX 970 Dual Fan Graphic Card (DIY Fan) Review:


Fans work awesome. The power cables are about 1/2" longer than the OEM and so you have to flip/twist them in order for them to fit under the heat shroud.

The fans themselves are super quiet and great replacement for the OEM fans on the card. Great cost savings vs spending $200+ on a new GPU.



FD8015U12S 75MM DC 12V 0.5A 4pin Cooling Fan For ASUS GT740 650Ti EAH6770 7750 8600 9800G 9600 GTS450 Graphics Card Cooler Fans Review:


This is the same fan as the original and hope it will last as long as the first - which was about ten years.
The noise level is the same as the original as well so no issue. This was not easy to find on Amazon but search
by the product model number found on the original fan and it pops to the top of the list.



inRobert 75mm GA81S2U DC 12V 0.38A 4Pin Cooler Fan Video Card Fan Replacement for Zotac GTX 970 Dual Fan Graphic Card (Original Fan) Review:


Fans work awesome. The power cables are about 1/2" longer than the OEM and so you have to flip/twist them in order for them to fit under the heat shroud.

The fans themselves are super quiet and great replacement for the OEM fans on the card. Great cost savings vs spending $200+ on a new GPU.



HA9010H12F-Z Graphics Card Cooling Fan For MSI GeForce GTX 1050Ti 2G 4G 1060 3G 6G OC Video Card Fans Review:


One of the fans of my ZOTAC GTX 1060 was making an annoying noise, its under warranty, but if I returned it to ZOTAC they would send me a reconditioned unit in exchange. My card is less than a year old, and manufacturers prefer to send you a reconditioned units instead of just repairing you product. Every reconditioned unit I've ever received looks well used. I was a factory service technician for many years, so if I can find the parts, I do the repairs myself. The fans appear to be OEM and are now quietly cooling my graphics card.



inRobert 87mm T129215SU Graphics Card Cooling Fan For ASUS STRIX GTX980Ti/R9390/RX480/RX580 Video Card Cooler (Fan-3pcs) Review:


Does the job. Had a Asus 1080 strix card that had a fan that exploded. Asus would not replace under warranty. They said that replacing the fan myself would void my warranty which I found hilarious because they weren’t going to honor it anyways. They also wanted $300.00 USD for the repair plus shipping both ways. Took about 10 minutes to replace. Just make sure that you order the right fan as each of the three fans have different hookups depending on where the fan is positioned in the shroud.



ARCTIC Accelero Xtreme IV High-End Graphics Card Cooler with Backside Cooler for Efficient RAM and VRM-Cooling DCACO-V800001-GBA01 Review:


I've had this installed a day now and the improvement in cooling is impressive. I recently picked up a used FE as an upgrade from my old but quiet card and the cooling in an FE is mediocre to say the least. After tuning all fans I routinely saw 72C while gaming and the card was noisy - running about 80% to maintain that 72C and the wife thought I was vacuuming instead of playing a game. While 72C is not an unreasonable temperature - the card throttles at about 83C - I wanted cooler and quieter and with a used card voiding the warranty was not an issue. After installing this the temperature peaks at about 51C - 20 degrees of improvement - and the card is silent. So mission achieved.

But here is what you should know before you do this -

- You need to completely remove the shell of the FE and the interior structural shelf and fan, etc. That involves removing every single tiny screw you can find - probably 30 or more of them - in many sizes. If you change your mind and want to go back it would be a challenge just managing the screws alone. Once you've stripped the card naked, you will be less impressed at what is really in that expensive card - not that much. You have to remove all of the backing as well. You need a jeweler's screwdriver, some very small Allen wrenches, and a very small nut driver. Didn't note the sizes, sorry.

- Then on to the thermal gluing. Use the old thermal squishy tape on the interior of the removed shell as a guide to where you need to glue the aluminum heat sinks. The kit includes a bunch of them so just pick what seems the best fit on each board element. It is delicate work. The kit also includes tiny clear insulating tape if you see a situation where the heat sink might touch something metal, but I didn't use any of it. Let it dry for an hour.

- Now you need to tape or glue the spacers to the mounting bracket in your new cooler. I didn't like this part of the design and thought there should be a better way - there are 3 different sizes of spacers and the double sided tape they included was impossible for me to get the second side backing off - you need surgeons hands and precision fingernails. So I didn't - I used the same thermal glue to glue the spacers (the 2.5mm ones that the 1080 uses) on top of the correct holes on the bracket. The spacers just need to stay in place long enough to mount the board to the cooler.

- Next connect the cooler fan cable to the 4 pin connector on the Nvidia board.

- Now with the cooler on it's back you lower the board onto the cooler and line up the 4 mounting holes to the glued spacers and put the supplied metal bracket over those holes - there is an almost invisible mylar coating on one side of the bracket and you want that downward because it is not conductive. Then there is a little foam piece you put on the underside of the bracket that also prevents the bracket from contacting the back side of the board. Put the 4 screws in, carefully tightening them in sequence and you are almost done. The cooler came with thermal paste already installed do you don't have to do anything there.

- That's it - just install the card back in your PC and cross your fingers. Use MSI Afterburner to tune your new fan curve.

A few more thoughts -

Note that the cooler is held in place with just those 4 screws hanging from the graphics card board, so this design is not great structurally - the original FE was built like a battleship and you are giving that up for a kit that is not that. For a PC in an office that doesn't move for years it will be fine, but I wouldn't strap your PC to an ATV where this thing might completely disintegrate from shaking. Installing an aftermarket graphics card support rail (that is what I did) will help but this is far more fragile than what I started with regardless. As this kit works with something like 30 different cards they don't include anything specific to any card, so any structural improvement must be improvised.

Also, with the backing gone you will want to spray out dust periodically - but then again this is no more exposed than your motherboard already is so that isn't a big deal, although the motherboard is vertical and therefore catches less dust than this will.

And finally, the FE exhausted all heat out the rear while this does not - the heat is sent into the case. You would think that would mean your case fans work harder but I found the opposite is true - my case fans are controlled by the "system" temperature measured by the motherboard and I found they barely come on now, where with the original FE they ran at a steady clip when gaming. So the original FE must have sent a lot of heat to the motherboard through the PCIe socket to drive up the system temperature. On the other hand, my CPU temps did rise a bit as the heat from this rises up towards the CPU cooler just above it. Nothing serious but notable.

I'd give this 5 stars for what it provided in terms of cooling, but am docking it a bit for the lack of any structural reinforcements and the problematic spacer issue. But no doubt part of the impressive cooling is just getting the FE out of the down parka that was the original plastic casing.

All in all I'm very happy with the vastly improved thermal performance and the quiet operation. But this was not a trivial install, which is why I included all of the long commentary. Good luck!



ARCTIC Accelero Xtreme III - High-End Graphics Card Cooler - nVidia & AMD, 3 Quiet 92mm PWM Fans, SLI/Crossfire. Review:


I've had this installed a day now and the improvement in cooling is impressive. I recently picked up a used FE as an upgrade from my old but quiet card and the cooling in an FE is mediocre to say the least. After tuning all fans I routinely saw 72C while gaming and the card was noisy - running about 80% to maintain that 72C and the wife thought I was vacuuming instead of playing a game. While 72C is not an unreasonable temperature - the card throttles at about 83C - I wanted cooler and quieter and with a used card voiding the warranty was not an issue. After installing this the temperature peaks at about 51C - 20 degrees of improvement - and the card is silent. So mission achieved.

But here is what you should know before you do this -

- You need to completely remove the shell of the FE and the interior structural shelf and fan, etc. That involves removing every single tiny screw you can find - probably 30 or more of them - in many sizes. If you change your mind and want to go back it would be a challenge just managing the screws alone. Once you've stripped the card naked, you will be less impressed at what is really in that expensive card - not that much. You have to remove all of the backing as well. You need a jeweler's screwdriver, some very small Allen wrenches, and a very small nut driver. Didn't note the sizes, sorry.

- Then on to the thermal gluing. Use the old thermal squishy tape on the interior of the removed shell as a guide to where you need to glue the aluminum heat sinks. The kit includes a bunch of them so just pick what seems the best fit on each board element. It is delicate work. The kit also includes tiny clear insulating tape if you see a situation where the heat sink might touch something metal, but I didn't use any of it. Let it dry for an hour.

- Now you need to tape or glue the spacers to the mounting bracket in your new cooler. I didn't like this part of the design and thought there should be a better way - there are 3 different sizes of spacers and the double sided tape they included was impossible for me to get the second side backing off - you need surgeons hands and precision fingernails. So I didn't - I used the same thermal glue to glue the spacers (the 2.5mm ones that the 1080 uses) on top of the correct holes on the bracket. The spacers just need to stay in place long enough to mount the board to the cooler.

- Next connect the cooler fan cable to the 4 pin connector on the Nvidia board.

- Now with the cooler on it's back you lower the board onto the cooler and line up the 4 mounting holes to the glued spacers and put the supplied metal bracket over those holes - there is an almost invisible mylar coating on one side of the bracket and you want that downward because it is not conductive. Then there is a little foam piece you put on the underside of the bracket that also prevents the bracket from contacting the back side of the board. Put the 4 screws in, carefully tightening them in sequence and you are almost done. The cooler came with thermal paste already installed do you don't have to do anything there.

- That's it - just install the card back in your PC and cross your fingers. Use MSI Afterburner to tune your new fan curve.

A few more thoughts -

Note that the cooler is held in place with just those 4 screws hanging from the graphics card board, so this design is not great structurally - the original FE was built like a battleship and you are giving that up for a kit that is not that. For a PC in an office that doesn't move for years it will be fine, but I wouldn't strap your PC to an ATV where this thing might completely disintegrate from shaking. Installing an aftermarket graphics card support rail (that is what I did) will help but this is far more fragile than what I started with regardless. As this kit works with something like 30 different cards they don't include anything specific to any card, so any structural improvement must be improvised.

Also, with the backing gone you will want to spray out dust periodically - but then again this is no more exposed than your motherboard already is so that isn't a big deal, although the motherboard is vertical and therefore catches less dust than this will.

And finally, the FE exhausted all heat out the rear while this does not - the heat is sent into the case. You would think that would mean your case fans work harder but I found the opposite is true - my case fans are controlled by the "system" temperature measured by the motherboard and I found they barely come on now, where with the original FE they ran at a steady clip when gaming. So the original FE must have sent a lot of heat to the motherboard through the PCIe socket to drive up the system temperature. On the other hand, my CPU temps did rise a bit as the heat from this rises up towards the CPU cooler just above it. Nothing serious but notable.

I'd give this 5 stars for what it provided in terms of cooling, but am docking it a bit for the lack of any structural reinforcements and the problematic spacer issue. But no doubt part of the impressive cooling is just getting the FE out of the down parka that was the original plastic casing.

All in all I'm very happy with the vastly improved thermal performance and the quiet operation. But this was not a trivial install, which is why I included all of the long commentary. Good luck!