Best Digital Reverb & Delay Effects in 2020



TC Helicon"TC Helicon VoiceTone Mic Mechanic 2 Reverb, Delay, Pitch Correction Pedal" Review:


This is quite an excellent unit. It works beautifully and the tap tempo feature if very useful for the delay. I also appreciate the fact that it runs on a 9V power supply so I can power it from my guitar pedal board and the fact that it has phantom power inbuilt since I use a Lewitt live condenser microphone. I have found only this and the Harmony Singer to be the the 2 really good pedals from TC Helicon. The rest I have passed on (like Duplicator, Critical Mass) having bought a few to test and then sold them in the secondary market.



ART SyncGen Wordclock Sample Rate Generator Review:


OMG FINALLY!!! I have been fighting with my M-Audio Profire 2626 and two PreSonus Digimax D8's for WEEKS trying to get them to sync. Apparently the profire has to low of a wordclock voltage output(I measured it at 1.7v) than the Digimax's require(I read somewhere it is 2.5v). This thing puts out 5.1 volts as I measure it, and everything sync'd INSTANTLY, and I have now recorded from all 3 interfaces with ZERO cracking, popping, or syncing issues. This thing is worth its weight in GOLD to me!



Lexicon MX200 Dual Stereo Reverb/Effects Processor with USB "Hardware Plug-In" Capability Review:


Ok, so you're looking for a reverb/effects unit but don't necessarily want to step up to the $1000 price range for a spx2000 or similar units... Well, look no further. The sheer flexibility of the MX400 is pretty astounding at this price point. You are essentially getting 2 stereo processors with a great range of reverb, delay, phaser, detune, de-esser, etc. options at your fingertips. It really is a very intuitive menu setup if you have worked with other outboard gear before, with a fairly mild learning curve if you haven't. Parameter editing is right there for you with the A/B/C knobs affecting the most common parameters of a particular effect, and further detailed editing is 2 clicks of the page/select button away. The in/out setup and mix routing offers a way to really blend all kinds of different effects together, do 4 channel surround, or even run 4 mono effects. Now I haven't delved into the usb portion of the unit itself as I run Protools, and would prefer to set it up as an "analog" in/out for my purposes, but if you're running a VST compatible DAW then it might be something that helps sell you on ease of use for the unit. It does only accept 16 or 24 bit 44.1k or 48k digital signals, so if you normally "oversample" to a 96k or some such this might be cause to run it as analog in/out only. As most home studio users do 24-bit 44.1k or 48k in their sessions nowadays anyway, it's not that big of an issue. With all that being said, this unit is GREAT for adding space or mild effects, but not something to create wild affectation of the original audio. Factory programs are decent but not pro studio amazing, however user programs are very easily stored and brought back with just a few button presses. I do wish it had a few more LED's for input monitoring, but at this price not something to complain too much about. Overall, best unit for sub $1000 money (blows out TC Electronic units for sound quality) and fits a ton of uses in your rig! I highly recommend checking out the manual at http://www.lexiconpro.com/en-US/products/mx400/downloads_and_docs for a real look into the huge amount of options this unit will give you!



Digitech Supernatural Ambient Stereo Reverb Review:


This pedal is exactly what I was looking for it has a bunch of different modes that all sound great and all the modes are actually really versatile thanks to the three primary controls
The mix nob controls the amount of reverb there is compared to your dry signal it goes from barely noticeable, subtle effects to 100% reverb. Most players will probably keep it at about 12 o'clock but if you turn it up really high its great for ambient, spacey, music.
The decay affects how long the reverb lasts. It goes from what's probably more sustain than you really need to really short punch sustain.
The liveliness control affects the amount of treble the effect processes. This makes your sound, as the name suggests, livelier. This makes the affect fuller, and more obvious, it also tends to increase sustain, so the way you set liveliness affects the other two controls. This gives the controls more diversity than it initially appears to because all the controls more or less work together so one change affects several attributes. This is really nice for fine tuning your sound.
The different modes all have really nice sounds as well, not only are there the ambient modes but plate and spring modes that aren't ambient, this gives the pedal the versatility to be used in almost any kind of music
the plate mode is the classic sounding reverb you probably hear in most music, you can use this setting in almost any kind of music, I use it a lot for rock and metal.
The plate mod mode is basically the same as the plate mode with a little chorus added to the affect. I don't really use it that much because I use my own chorus sound but it's still a really good usable effect.
The spring mode is also the classic spring reverb effect we all know and love. I tend to use it a bit more than the plate mode but they are both great, studio quality, reverbs.
The ambient settings are stunning
Especially shine. It has a cascading pitch shift added to the effect that makes a really creepy, haunting, sound. I love this effect honestly if this was the only setting the pedal would still be worth it. If you turn the mix down it adds a really eerie sound to your guitar that isn't to over the top. And with the liveliness turned way up it makes some hauntingly beautiful sounds.
Supernova conjures up a spacey, strangely isolating, sound that unearthly beauty much like shine turning the mix down adds a really alien sound to your guitar that isn't to over the top. And with the liveliness turned way up it makes some crazy sounds.
The shimmer setting is basically the shine setting with chorus added, honestly I think this kind of ruins the effect so I don't use it much, but its still a quality effect.
Pherb is a hall reverb effect with heavy phasing added to it. I actually really like this sound. It's some what in between the "standard' reverbs on the device and the ambient settings. It has a really unique sound that can be used for both ambient stuff and normal music

All and and all you can make some fantastic, and diverse, sounds with this pedal. I would recommend it for any style of music and it's the only reverb I'll use for the foreseeable future.



Lexicon MX400XL 4-in/4-out Reverb/Effects Processor with USB "Hardware Plug-In" Capability and XLR Review:


Ok, so you're looking for a reverb/effects unit but don't necessarily want to step up to the $1000 price range for a spx2000 or similar units... Well, look no further. The sheer flexibility of the MX400 is pretty astounding at this price point. You are essentially getting 2 stereo processors with a great range of reverb, delay, phaser, detune, de-esser, etc. options at your fingertips. It really is a very intuitive menu setup if you have worked with other outboard gear before, with a fairly mild learning curve if you haven't. Parameter editing is right there for you with the A/B/C knobs affecting the most common parameters of a particular effect, and further detailed editing is 2 clicks of the page/select button away. The in/out setup and mix routing offers a way to really blend all kinds of different effects together, do 4 channel surround, or even run 4 mono effects. Now I haven't delved into the usb portion of the unit itself as I run Protools, and would prefer to set it up as an "analog" in/out for my purposes, but if you're running a VST compatible DAW then it might be something that helps sell you on ease of use for the unit. It does only accept 16 or 24 bit 44.1k or 48k digital signals, so if you normally "oversample" to a 96k or some such this might be cause to run it as analog in/out only. As most home studio users do 24-bit 44.1k or 48k in their sessions nowadays anyway, it's not that big of an issue. With all that being said, this unit is GREAT for adding space or mild effects, but not something to create wild affectation of the original audio. Factory programs are decent but not pro studio amazing, however user programs are very easily stored and brought back with just a few button presses. I do wish it had a few more LED's for input monitoring, but at this price not something to complain too much about. Overall, best unit for sub $1000 money (blows out TC Electronic units for sound quality) and fits a ton of uses in your rig! I highly recommend checking out the manual at http://www.lexiconpro.com/en-US/products/mx400/downloads_and_docs for a real look into the huge amount of options this unit will give you!



Alesis Nanoverb 2 | Digital Effects Processor with 16 Program Settings for 256 Effects Review:


This is a simple, no-nonsense effects processor. Great for on the desktop or for solo acts. The price is very fair.

Update 6/1/14:
This processor is still working great, even after being left on (plugged in) since I first added my review. There's been a bit of getting used to it, but now that the levels are dialed in (send and return on mixer, input, mix and output on processor) I have no issues with noise and am finding it very easy to use.

I'd like to add that this is a handy add-on if you're stuck using a mixer without built-in effects.