Best Deadbolts in 2020



Home Security Door Lock with 8 Screws, Childproof Door Reinforcement Lock with 3" Stop Withstand 800 lbs for Inward Swinging Door,Upgrade Night Lock to Defend Your Home Review:


Super easy to install looks nice and really secure. As a police officer with training in CEPTED and other crime prevention practices I can say a secondary lock such as this works well at preventing forced door entries. Also, this will keep your little ones from opening the front door and sneaking out into the street.

My suggestion for install. Figure out where it fits best on your door frame by holding it up and and testing the door does not make contact with the lock when opening and closing. Then draw around the screw plate leaving the mark on the frame. Use a chisel and hammer and take the wood in that space out by lightly taping the wood out with chisel and hammer. Then put the screw plate in that chisled opening. Screw in with 3 inch screws, buy them on your own. (3 inch adds extra security). Cover with wood filler, sand and paint. It will look perfect when done. (Yes I still have to sand and paint for the final finish)



Schlage Encode Smart WiFi Deadbolt with Camelot Trim in Satin Nickel (BE489WB CAM 619) Review:


My purchase of a Schlage Encode electronic front door lock and the matching FE285 handle and latch set (purchased separately) yielded several lessons in how to select such devices while avoiding most of the problems.

Upon receipt of the lock, I had Lowes re-key it to match my other Schlage house locks (a free service at my Lowes). But note: have this done BEFORE you install the lock! Otherwise, a locksmith must come to your location and will charge accordingly.

I have installed my lock and set it up. It will provide access to my home if I require 911 services (I live alone). My medical alert company has a temporary access code for the lock, which it will provide only to 911 responders. And If I am unable to delete that code immediately after responders access my home, that can be done remotely by family members or friends who have downloaded, installed, and set up the Schlage Home app on a compatible cell phone. That prevents responders from abusing the code to burglarize the home later. There is the added reassurance that any use of an access code can generate an immediate alarm on the Schlage Home app.

I had to contact Schlage’s excellent customer service by phone to complete the installation and programming of the lock. The Schlage web site has a contact phone number, which is answered by real humans.

Some important considerations:

1. This still isn’t a mature market with the ideal combination of design and functional features. It’s likely you won’t get all the aspects of appearance and function that you want in one model. And with Encode being a fairly new model, for which the rollout does not seem to have included a complete set of installation and programming instructions, you are likely to be calling Schlage’s helpful customer support staff for assistance.

2. The Encode Camelot lock does not appear to be available as a set with a matching Camelot latch set FE285. Such combinations are available with some other locks, along with discounts for ordering both sets of hardware together.

3. Encode is similar to Schlage’s other electronic locks (Sense, Touch, Connect), but don’t be misled by this similarity. The setup is deceptively similar, but the programming instructions for those other products don’t work with Encode, nor are the instructions intuitive. It’s challenging to locate programming instructions for the Encode on Schlage’s web site. On the FAQs section of the Schlage Home app, Encode doesn’t even appear as a selection option for programming instructions.

4. Encode is the only Schlage model (that I know of) that can connect to your WiFi network without the use of an external hub or WiFi adapter. That’s why I purchased it. Advantage: one less device and wireless connection to go wrong. Disadvantages: WiFi transceivers use a fair amount of power, shortening the battery life. And you can’t set up the WiFi connection unless you download and install the free Schlage Home app, or other compatible app, onto a compatible cell phone, and set up the connection using the app.

5. The instructions are insufficient. My standardized door cutouts for the latch and lock matched the enclosed template, but neither the latch nor the lock was centered within their respective holes as they should have been. I had to remove material from these holes on the sides closest to the edge of the door to make room for their installations. This, despite the Encode replacing Schlage’s similar, manual latch set and lock on the same door. The biggest omission from the Quick Start Guide: WiFi is not even mentioned, let alone explained.

6. The Schlage Home app’s user interface is minimalist―too much so, for me.

7. Encode is available only in a limited set of finishes. For example, there was not an antique brass finish to match the Schlage interior hardware in my home. I went with the Camelot version with the Aged Bronze finish, hoping for sort of a match. This was a mistake. Aged Bronze not only is much redder than the yellowish Antique Brass―it is so dark that one can’t tell from just a few feet away whether the lock is engaged or not. Like a black hole, it simply doesn’t reflect enough light to see any detail. If I were to start the selection process again, I would go with one of the modern Encode Century designs with very visible features. They will fit any decor as well as, or better than, the option I chose.

8. The Encode keypad and I still are not getting along. As with cell phone keypads, this one’s sensitivity seems to vary from one key press to the next. And when one is entering, say, the six-digit programming code (necessary for adding or deleting user codes), there is no indication of where one is in the process. If you accidentally touch a key twice in rapid succession by mistake, for example, there will be no clue that this has happened. In such situations, you’re likely to fumble for a while and finally start over (expletives deleted). You must press the exact center of a number for it to respond. Easier said than done, during a winter blast or soaking downpour, and when the keypad is somewhere around your navel’s level. I would much prefer a push-button keypad with tactile feedback whenever a key is successfully pressed, similar to a mechanical computer keyboard. Some other Schlage models have push buttons, but those models will not directly connect to a WiFi network.

9. Some electronic locks accept an access code, then require the user to turn the deadbolt manually. Encode automatically moves the deadbolt without your involvement. Slick. But there is a cost. If your door is not exactly and correctly positioned, the deadbolt will rub against the strike and will not travel the required distance for the lock to be fully engaged. This reduces security, and a deadbolt rubbing against the strike plate is likely to draw more power, further reducing battery life and possibly damaging the tiny bolt motor. In the best of all possible worlds, all doors are positioned perfectly forever. In reality, even doors that are perfectly positioned at the outset are very likely to shift and rub over time, due to expansion, contraction, and warping of materials, or shifting of the house. For that reason, I prefer mechanical operation of the deadbolt. But Schlage models with that feature do not connect to WiFi directly.

So, there you have it. Look at lock options carefully and choose the compromise that works bests for you.



Schlage Encode Smart WiFi Deadbolt with Camelot Trim in Aged Bronze (BE489WB CAM 716) Review:


My purchase of a Schlage Encode electronic front door lock and the matching FE285 handle and latch set (purchased separately) yielded several lessons in how to select such devices while avoiding most of the problems.

Upon receipt of the lock, I had Lowes re-key it to match my other Schlage house locks (a free service at my Lowes). But note: have this done BEFORE you install the lock! Otherwise, a locksmith must come to your location and will charge accordingly.

I have installed my lock and set it up. It will provide access to my home if I require 911 services (I live alone). My medical alert company has a temporary access code for the lock, which it will provide only to 911 responders. And If I am unable to delete that code immediately after responders access my home, that can be done remotely by family members or friends who have downloaded, installed, and set up the Schlage Home app on a compatible cell phone. That prevents responders from abusing the code to burglarize the home later. There is the added reassurance that any use of an access code can generate an immediate alarm on the Schlage Home app.

I had to contact Schlage’s excellent customer service by phone to complete the installation and programming of the lock. The Schlage web site has a contact phone number, which is answered by real humans.

Some important considerations:

1. This still isn’t a mature market with the ideal combination of design and functional features. It’s likely you won’t get all the aspects of appearance and function that you want in one model. And with Encode being a fairly new model, for which the rollout does not seem to have included a complete set of installation and programming instructions, you are likely to be calling Schlage’s helpful customer support staff for assistance.

2. The Encode Camelot lock does not appear to be available as a set with a matching Camelot latch set FE285. Such combinations are available with some other locks, along with discounts for ordering both sets of hardware together.

3. Encode is similar to Schlage’s other electronic locks (Sense, Touch, Connect), but don’t be misled by this similarity. The setup is deceptively similar, but the programming instructions for those other products don’t work with Encode, nor are the instructions intuitive. It’s challenging to locate programming instructions for the Encode on Schlage’s web site. On the FAQs section of the Schlage Home app, Encode doesn’t even appear as a selection option for programming instructions.

4. Encode is the only Schlage model (that I know of) that can connect to your WiFi network without the use of an external hub or WiFi adapter. That’s why I purchased it. Advantage: one less device and wireless connection to go wrong. Disadvantages: WiFi transceivers use a fair amount of power, shortening the battery life. And you can’t set up the WiFi connection unless you download and install the free Schlage Home app, or other compatible app, onto a compatible cell phone, and set up the connection using the app.

5. The instructions are insufficient. My standardized door cutouts for the latch and lock matched the enclosed template, but neither the latch nor the lock was centered within their respective holes as they should have been. I had to remove material from these holes on the sides closest to the edge of the door to make room for their installations. This, despite the Encode replacing Schlage’s similar, manual latch set and lock on the same door. The biggest omission from the Quick Start Guide: WiFi is not even mentioned, let alone explained.

6. The Schlage Home app’s user interface is minimalist―too much so, for me.

7. Encode is available only in a limited set of finishes. For example, there was not an antique brass finish to match the Schlage interior hardware in my home. I went with the Camelot version with the Aged Bronze finish, hoping for sort of a match. This was a mistake. Aged Bronze not only is much redder than the yellowish Antique Brass―it is so dark that one can’t tell from just a few feet away whether the lock is engaged or not. Like a black hole, it simply doesn’t reflect enough light to see any detail. If I were to start the selection process again, I would go with one of the modern Encode Century designs with very visible features. They will fit any decor as well as, or better than, the option I chose.

8. The Encode keypad and I still are not getting along. As with cell phone keypads, this one’s sensitivity seems to vary from one key press to the next. And when one is entering, say, the six-digit programming code (necessary for adding or deleting user codes), there is no indication of where one is in the process. If you accidentally touch a key twice in rapid succession by mistake, for example, there will be no clue that this has happened. In such situations, you’re likely to fumble for a while and finally start over (expletives deleted). You must press the exact center of a number for it to respond. Easier said than done, during a winter blast or soaking downpour, and when the keypad is somewhere around your navel’s level. I would much prefer a push-button keypad with tactile feedback whenever a key is successfully pressed, similar to a mechanical computer keyboard. Some other Schlage models have push buttons, but those models will not directly connect to a WiFi network.

9. Some electronic locks accept an access code, then require the user to turn the deadbolt manually. Encode automatically moves the deadbolt without your involvement. Slick. But there is a cost. If your door is not exactly and correctly positioned, the deadbolt will rub against the strike and will not travel the required distance for the lock to be fully engaged. This reduces security, and a deadbolt rubbing against the strike plate is likely to draw more power, further reducing battery life and possibly damaging the tiny bolt motor. In the best of all possible worlds, all doors are positioned perfectly forever. In reality, even doors that are perfectly positioned at the outset are very likely to shift and rub over time, due to expansion, contraction, and warping of materials, or shifting of the house. For that reason, I prefer mechanical operation of the deadbolt. But Schlage models with that feature do not connect to WiFi directly.

So, there you have it. Look at lock options carefully and choose the compromise that works bests for you.



Kwikset 99070-101 Powerbolt 2 Door Lock Single Cylinder Electronic Keyless Entry Deadbolt featuring SmartKey Security in Satin Nickel Review:


In my house I currently have a Wink 2 hub and I have a combination of Nest, Z-Wave switches, My Q Garage Door and the next thing on the list was a to get a Z-Wave deadbolt for the front door. I didn't just want a regular Z-Wave deadbolt, I wanted one with an external keypad so I can program it for our dog sitter, mother-in-law and neighbors when they watch my house and/or dogs. So I looked at all of the Kwikset Z-Wave locks and made up my mind to buy the touchscreen model however upon reading more reviews and playing with it at a local hardware store, I decided that I wanted physical buttons. So I choose this model.

The until came in double boxed with all of the pieces and although I read the reviews about long install time, trouble pairing with home automation hubs, I had it installed and was locking and unlocking the door with my phone through the Wink app within 15 minutes. I was VERY pleased. Re-Keying it to my existing Kwikset Tustin locks took me an additional 5 minutes later that evening.

Looking to buy another for our backdoor as well as for the door that leads to the garage. So very pleased with the purchase.



August Home ASL-03, AC-R1 Smart Lock Pro + Connect Wi-Fi Bridge Bundle, 100, Silver Review:


In my house I currently have a Wink 2 hub and I have a combination of Nest, Z-Wave switches, My Q Garage Door and the next thing on the list was a to get a Z-Wave deadbolt for the front door. I didn't just want a regular Z-Wave deadbolt, I wanted one with an external keypad so I can program it for our dog sitter, mother-in-law and neighbors when they watch my house and/or dogs. So I looked at all of the Kwikset Z-Wave locks and made up my mind to buy the touchscreen model however upon reading more reviews and playing with it at a local hardware store, I decided that I wanted physical buttons. So I choose this model.

The until came in double boxed with all of the pieces and although I read the reviews about long install time, trouble pairing with home automation hubs, I had it installed and was locking and unlocking the door with my phone through the Wink app within 15 minutes. I was VERY pleased. Re-Keying it to my existing Kwikset Tustin locks took me an additional 5 minutes later that evening.

Looking to buy another for our backdoor as well as for the door that leads to the garage. So very pleased with the purchase.



August Home AK-R1 August Smart Keypad, Dark Gray Review:


In my house I currently have a Wink 2 hub and I have a combination of Nest, Z-Wave switches, My Q Garage Door and the next thing on the list was a to get a Z-Wave deadbolt for the front door. I didn't just want a regular Z-Wave deadbolt, I wanted one with an external keypad so I can program it for our dog sitter, mother-in-law and neighbors when they watch my house and/or dogs. So I looked at all of the Kwikset Z-Wave locks and made up my mind to buy the touchscreen model however upon reading more reviews and playing with it at a local hardware store, I decided that I wanted physical buttons. So I choose this model.

The until came in double boxed with all of the pieces and although I read the reviews about long install time, trouble pairing with home automation hubs, I had it installed and was locking and unlocking the door with my phone through the Wink app within 15 minutes. I was VERY pleased. Re-Keying it to my existing Kwikset Tustin locks took me an additional 5 minutes later that evening.

Looking to buy another for our backdoor as well as for the door that leads to the garage. So very pleased with the purchase.



Ultraloq UL3 BT Bluetooth Enabled Fingerprint and Touchscreen Smart Lock (Satin Nickel) | 5-in-1 Keyless Entry | Secure Finger ID | Anti-peep Code | Works with iOS and Android | Match Home Aesthetics Review:


I purchased this for my apartment building in December. A few things: first, I don't own the building, but I am a longtime tenant. It is a 7 unit-building with three exterior entrances. The property manager lives in the building and runs the (absentee) owner's company. We live a few blocks off Haight Street in San Francisco, and package theft for items left on the front porch has been an issue. I offered to purchase locks for the exterior doors (all three) if the property manager took care of the installation (and any flak from the owner). Since I plan on staying in the building for a long time, it was an expense that I was willing to bear.

That out of the way, here are my impressions and those of my fellow tenants:

Ease of Setup: 2 stars. It isn't too difficult to set up the Utraloqs on first blush, and it looks like you can quickly copy the setup from one lock to another, but it is actually a pain if you are trying to create entries for multiple users. For our setup, the property manager and I were to be administrators. In my professional life, I have more than a passing familiarity with good security (technical and otherwise) practices, and I also set up a separate user account for both of us (which was good, because the property manager quickly forgot the administrator account that I had set up but had no problem remembering the user account). But for each unit in the building, I had to assign a number to each intended user, because you use the keypad to add all the new accounts and it is numeric only. I had to assign one for each tenant, and not each apartment, because the biometric captures only one finger per user account. Then I realized that some of us (myself included) wanted to record a finger from each hand, to make it easier to use if we were carrying a package, which meant I had to make two user accounts for each person that wanted to record two fingers. And while using the keypad is convenient in that you don't need an app to add users, it is certainly a pain from the perspective of User Interface. It should be noted that there is a place in the Ultraloq App for you to add a name to a user, but more on that below.

Installation: I didn't handle this, a trained locksmith did, but he said it was painless and asked me about the locks, as he may start recommending them to others.

Battery life: 5 out of 5. They have been in use constantly for four months with no issues. Batteries are AA, and I am using AmazonBasics rechargeables without an issue.

Usage - Keypad: 4 out of 5. The keypad stays asleep (and dark) until you need to use it, then it wakes up. You type in your code and press the enter key, which is a symbol (look at the picture of the keypad if you don't know what I mean). I have only had one person that couldn't figure out how to use the keypad, and to be fair, there's no indication that you need to press enter, but everyone else, from delivery drivers to cleaning services, figured it out on their own.

Usage - Biometrics: 4 out of 5. The reader wakes up very quickly, and when it gets it right on the first try, it is amazingly fast. However, your mileage will vary based on the placement of your finger (relative to when you originally recorded it), the weather (if it is cold or very dry, the reader may have more difficulty than during warmer weather), the cleanliness of the reader (obviously, if it is smudged with mud, it won't work so well) and the condition of your chosen finger. One trick that works when it's cold or your skin is dry - touch the surface of your finger to your forehead, then touch the reader, and the additional transferred skin oil aids the reader in picking up your whorls and ridges.

Usage - Bluetooth: NR. Honestly, none of us use this. I tested it and it works, but a sample size of one test use is insufficient for a rating.

Usage - Manual Key: NR. The keys exist for emergencies and should not be used as a regular means of opening the locks. The company says this, our locksmith said this, and they definitely feel flimsy.

Ultraloq App: 2 out of 5. The app exists. It shows you the locks. It works most of the time to open them. It has difficulty maintaining a connection when performing administrative maintenance. It lacks the ability to move most of the administration work from the lock to the app. It *does* keep a security log of who has successfully used the lock and any unsuccessful attempts, as well as administrative logins; however, it is difficult to maintain a connection long enough to download the log. It does monitor rough battery status, but I have found this to be very unreliable.

Right now, I am awaiting the release of the bridges that upgrade the usability of these locks. In theory this will allow me to set certain codes to only work during certain days / times (like delivery drivers) and more easily administer the locks for the building. I purchased three of the bridges, but they have yet to be released by Ultraloq.

In conclusion, despite the fact I didn't just give everything five stars and say the locks are amazing, these are pretty good locks for the money. They do about 75% of what we need them to do, and they work flawlessly about 90% of the time. Not a single tenant has complained about the switch; on the contrary, almost everyone in the building has thanked me for purchasing them for the building. The property manager has left me with the responsibility of maintaining the user database until it's a bit easier, but I don't mind. Most of the delivery companies have no problems using the codes we have given them, with the notable exception of Amazon Logistics (who keeps leaving packages on the porch without even trying the code, but we are working on this) and OnTrac (although we may have them onboard now). If the functionality of the smartphone interface, the ease of adding, deleting, and modifying users, or the enhanced capabilities of the forthcoming bridges were addressed, I would not hesitate to give this five stars. Until then, this is not a perfect system, but I do recommend it.