Best Computer Trackballs in 2020



Hard Travel Case for Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball Computer Wireless Mouse by co2CREA Review:


I travel quite a bit with my beloved trackball. I really feel like I have responsibility to go out into the world and let them know what they don't know, the joys of trackballs. I'm often met with quizzical looks and bewilderment, people struggling to determine what manner of device I possess. Upon knowing, they find it incomprehensible that such a device could be functional. it's a heavy burden, to be sure, educating these poor lost souls. Nevertheless, I take it on willingly.

But if I'm going to travel with it, how am I to protect it from the horrifying buffet of hazards along the way? I often ride a motorcycle, it gets banged or crushed in the luggage. Heavens me, what to do? I have to get this device to the public so they, too, can buy one and live fuller lives. A soft case isn't going to stop it from being crushed!

What you say?!? You have a hard case with a soft interior?!? How is that even possible!

Anyway, long story short, I'm saving lives out there, and this hard travel case for my Logitech M570 supports me in that noble goal of trackball evangelizing.

Please, anyone reading this with a mouse in your hand. Stop it! There's so much more for you in this world!



Hard Travel Case for Logitech MX Ergo Advanced Wireless Trackball Mouse by co2CREA (Case for Mouse) Review:


I am a lover of hard cases to protect just about anything that I plan to move around outside my house with any regularity. This case fit my Logitech MX ERGO Advanced Wireless Trackball for Windows PC and Mac perfectly. I pushed on it and there was no compression at the zipper, and I can hear no buttons clicking, so I am satisfied that the case is actually protecting my new trackball.
The interior is a soft, well cushoned felt material with no odor. Also in the package was a detachable lanyard that can hook to the zipper. I'm not sure if I will ever use it for anything to do with the case - it sits in a junk drawer to probably be thrown out the next time I move.

This case is just for the Logitech MX ERGO Advanced Wireless Trackball for Windows PC and Mac, and wont fit the charging cable or the USB adapter. This is a plus for me because I like to cut down on bulk, but it may be an issue for others.



Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball Mouse – Ergonomic Design with Sculpted Right-hand Shape, Compatible with Apple Mac and Microsoft Windows Computers, USB Unifying Receiver, Dark Gray Review:


Just put my 5th M570 into use and ordered two more. They last about 2 years unless you eat fried chicken at the computer - real ball killer.
This last M570 is the only one that did not die due to greasy ball syndrome- it is difficult to clean if the grease has been there long, the plastic softens making the ball grabby on the suspension points. At a little over 2 years, the left click key started double clicking. I have bought new balls in the past, but the whole M570 is so inexpensive now that I don't bother when soap and water doesn't fix it.
Dealing with carpel tunnel and popping ibuprophen like popcorn until retirement, my modified M570 allowed me to avoid the surgery.
Back when the old mouse's had a ball they were finicky and I was ending up with a "death grip" on it to get it to work. Your wrist was always an odd angle and flexing under load when moving the mouse.
The M570 fixed the "death grip" issue and the pictured 30 degree mounting wedge fixes the odd wrist angle issue by bringing the wrist back to neutral. This block of wood has been in use for about 15 years and 5 M570's.
Attached with foam core double stick tape the opening in the the block allows access to the switch and battery. The 4 feet on the bottom are globs of silicone (bathroom) caulk applied and then the block is set on wax paper, spaced up by sucker sticks and let dry to form the feet.
The page up and down buttons on the track ball are real handy surfing. I realized this when I had to use a mouse again, drag the arrow up and point/click the arrows at the page top was a real inconvenience.



Kensington Orbit Trackball Mouse with Scroll Ring (K72337US) Review:


I've used this same trackball for several years (bought it in 2012 or 2013, I forget which) - bought it to stop my carpal tunnel wrist issues. It's only just starting to have glitchy problems (not holding drag'n'drops even after alcohol cleaning of all the workings). I'm a heavy user - 10-12 hours x 5-6 days a week of lots of word processing, spreadsheets, accounting, etc. - so I'm quite happy that I haven't had to replace it before now. It has survived my wear and tear and the odd (light) coffee spill. I added a pillow to support my wrist in a more ergonomic way, but otherwise nicely designed.



Kensington Orbit Trackball Mouse (K64327F) Review:


Looks nice enough, ball rolls easily, buttons are a bit stiffer than I'd like but not unbearable.
Pros:
-Software provides mapping for left, right, and left+right click for a wide variety of functions.
-Ball rolls easily in all directions due to the way it's mounted (three-point floating).
-Sensor is pretty accurate, and when configured properly you can throw the cursor across the screen and still be accurate when selecting text or clicking buttons.
-Software provides lots of configuration options for this mouse. It doesn't cover everything, but it's nothing to sniff at.

Cons:
-Don't know if it's because of the plastic balls that the trackball rolls on or the trackball itself, but the ball tends to jump when rolling forward or backward. When I put the ball from my old Logitech Trackman (T-BC21) into it, it doesn't exhibit this problem, but that could be due to the oils on the ball (I haven't used the new ball much yet, so my skin oil hasn't coated it, and I haven't put any oil on it).
-For sure due to the way the ball is mounted: it *will* fall out if you turn the mouse over without securing the ball with your hand. I don't personally consider this an issue, but some will. Just thought I'd mention it for anyone who cares.
-The buttons are pretty stiff--it's not so bad with the left button, but I don't have herculese hands so my pinky has some difficulty pressing the right button.
-There is no scroll function, either in the Kensington software or in the mouse itself, which seems silly since they already have the ability to map buttons. Thankfully, there are 3rd party solutions (autohotkey, x-mouse button control, to name a couple), but it seems like something as basic as this should be a feature in mice today.

Overall, I think it's a good budget mouse. The lack of scroll function and bumpy ball lost it a star, but it does what it's designed to do and looks good doing it, and the other software features are pretty extensive. I think it's worth the money if you can't afford to get something higher-end.



Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW) Review:


I am a film and video editor with more than 25 years of experience. I only write reviews when I think i can really help other people by sharing information.

I film a lot but when editing comes, I can spend 9 hours editing per day. Weeks ago I started feeling some pain in my shoulder, after doing some research I realized it was a mild case of RSI.

Surely, I realized that to stop RSI you need to tackle chair, posture, desk, keyboard, etc. So, keep that in mind when reading my review.

So, lets talk about the mouse. I tried several vertical mouses, I tried ergonomic mouses and even some gaming mouses, the pain was the same and with some of them even worst.

I tried the logitech m570 trackball and found that the way its built you need to use your thumb to handle the trackball. Also, really precise movements as the ones needed in graphic design or video editing are hard to perform with the m570, even more if you are a fast editor, or an editor who thinks fast and wants to keep what your hands do up with what your mind solves.

I tried the Kensington Expert Trackball (wired version) and, at the beginning, I liked the big trackball but did not find much difference. Still, precise movements were not easy.

But then I read some useful reviews and found the solution, and now I love this trackball. I can edit for hours without arm fatigue and, best of all, I do not feel my arm while editing!!!

Without any doubt, this trackball is the best mouse replacement device ever. My next step will be to try a Wacom Tablet, but for now I am in a honeymoon with my Trackball!!!

So, the keys to effectively use this trackball for video editing or other activity that requires extremely precise movements is:

1.Move the trackball with your index finger with occasional help from middle finger. DO NOT use your thumb to move the trackball because that will put you in more pain if you have RSI or will develop other problems if you are OK.

2. I use a MAC, but I assume you can do the same in PC. In Mac, go to Control Panel, Mouse speed control (not the specific speed of trackball but the general mouse speed) and put it right at center or one line before (slower) than center.

3. I use a MAC, but I assume you can do the same in PC. In Mac, go to Control Panel and in the panel of the Trackball, check for the tab that controls speed, set the speed between 20 - 40% (the exact number will depend on your style of editing, fast or slow movements). This will help you to do precise movements without problem, but will reduce the speed of the pointer to traverse big distances fast. So, to help with that, in the same tab, set up the acceleration of trackball around 40-70%. This will help the trackball to catch some speed when you spin it to move the pointer from a one point to another in the other side of the screen or in a second screen.

4. The trackball has 4 buttons that you can customize in the same tab mentioned before. As default, the lower buttons are set to right and left click. I suggest you to set up the upper left button or the upper right button to drag lock, that way you will stop one of the worst activities for RSI, the dragging. With drag lock, you click on item with the drag lock button, you move it and then you drop it with another click of same button.

I hope this review can help other video editors, or graphic designers, or sound mixers, looking to protect their hand/arms, or trying to stop RSI or even carpal tunnel.



Kensington Expert Trackball Mouse (K64325) Review:


I am a film and video editor with more than 25 years of experience. I only write reviews when I think i can really help other people by sharing information.

I film a lot but when editing comes, I can spend 9 hours editing per day. Weeks ago I started feeling some pain in my shoulder, after doing some research I realized it was a mild case of RSI.

Surely, I realized that to stop RSI you need to tackle chair, posture, desk, keyboard, etc. So, keep that in mind when reading my review.

So, lets talk about the mouse. I tried several vertical mouses, I tried ergonomic mouses and even some gaming mouses, the pain was the same and with some of them even worst.

I tried the logitech m570 trackball and found that the way its built you need to use your thumb to handle the trackball. Also, really precise movements as the ones needed in graphic design or video editing are hard to perform with the m570, even more if you are a fast editor, or an editor who thinks fast and wants to keep what your hands do up with what your mind solves.

I tried the Kensington Expert Trackball (wired version) and, at the beginning, I liked the big trackball but did not find much difference. Still, precise movements were not easy.

But then I read some useful reviews and found the solution, and now I love this trackball. I can edit for hours without arm fatigue and, best of all, I do not feel my arm while editing!!!

Without any doubt, this trackball is the best mouse replacement device ever. My next step will be to try a Wacom Tablet, but for now I am in a honeymoon with my Trackball!!!

So, the keys to effectively use this trackball for video editing or other activity that requires extremely precise movements is:

1.Move the trackball with your index finger with occasional help from middle finger. DO NOT use your thumb to move the trackball because that will put you in more pain if you have RSI or will develop other problems if you are OK.

2. I use a MAC, but I assume you can do the same in PC. In Mac, go to Control Panel, Mouse speed control (not the specific speed of trackball but the general mouse speed) and put it right at center or one line before (slower) than center.

3. I use a MAC, but I assume you can do the same in PC. In Mac, go to Control Panel and in the panel of the Trackball, check for the tab that controls speed, set the speed between 20 - 40% (the exact number will depend on your style of editing, fast or slow movements). This will help you to do precise movements without problem, but will reduce the speed of the pointer to traverse big distances fast. So, to help with that, in the same tab, set up the acceleration of trackball around 40-70%. This will help the trackball to catch some speed when you spin it to move the pointer from a one point to another in the other side of the screen or in a second screen.

4. The trackball has 4 buttons that you can customize in the same tab mentioned before. As default, the lower buttons are set to right and left click. I suggest you to set up the upper left button or the upper right button to drag lock, that way you will stop one of the worst activities for RSI, the dragging. With drag lock, you click on item with the drag lock button, you move it and then you drop it with another click of same button.

I hope this review can help other video editors, or graphic designers, or sound mixers, looking to protect their hand/arms, or trying to stop RSI or even carpal tunnel.



Perixx Perimice-517 Wired Trackball USB Mouse, 7 Button Design, Build-in 1.34 Inch Trackball with Pointing Feature Review:


I'm going out of my way to write this review, and tempted to keep it a secret, but I feel obligated to save others the time and money I spent in my search for a "gaming-worthy" trackball mouse. Aside from comfort and design, LEDs and other bells and whistles, most "pro-gaming" mice have two crucial settings for performance and accuracy; polling rate (the rate at which the mouse position is sampled) and DPI (the resolution at which the sampling occurs).

Few trackballs offer adjustable DPI, and none of them offer higher polling rates, which makes the DPI settings almost useless in most cases. Every trackball mouse I've tested polls at a (default) rate of about ~128Hz (at best). One can sometimes "hack" overclocking the USB port via 3rd party drivers (though I do NOT recommend doing this!), but it's just that; a hack.

I have used trackball mice as my "secret weapon" since the days of the original Doom / Quake and the beginnings of eSports. They are (were) far superior both in terms of comfort and control. However, for whatever reason, perhaps influence from eSports companies / sponsors, trackballs have been left behind in terms of performance. I own perhaps a dozen trackball mice; Including Elecom, Sanwa, and Logitech, including the original Logitech Trackman (still the best of the bunch). Even the latest and greatest of the "performance" trackballs lack basic performance capability and some seem to try and compensate by offering additional bells and whistles that compromise the simplistic design (just try gaming with an MX Ergo while you press the right mouse button a little too hard to zoom in and accidentally tilt the mouse from zero to twenty degrees and your thumb slips off the trackball and hits the DPI switch from normal to ultra-super-high DPI). It's the difference between "frag or be fragged" in the heat of battle.

Where accuracy intensive weapons are concerned (e.g. Lightning gun or Rail gun in Quake), the polling rate is a critical setting to help ensure your mouse is polling fast enough to keep up with the game FPS (frames per second) which is dependent upon your GPU and Monitor refresh rate and DPI as well. It's a delicate balance, and the last thing you need is laggy input devices. If you're serious about gaming, these settings are nothing new. Again, though, for whatever reason, trackballs have been left behind, and companies have yet to enable the same performance capabilities for their trackball mice offerings as they do for their "pro-gaming" mice offerings... until now.

When I plugged in the Perixx, it was immediately recognized by the OS (Windows 10 Pro x64) as Full-Speed USB mouse. This means I'm getting nearly twice the polling rate at ~256Hz. This is still nowhere near the 500-2000Hz pro-gaming mice offer, but this seemingly small change in polling rate make a _huge_ difference in games in terms of smoothness and accuracy.

The Perixx trackball is flatter and wider than the Logitech offerings (which I do like for comfort). However, the flatness does seem to keep one's wrist straighter, and the wideness provides extra support for your pinky finger. I've been playing 6 to 8 hour tourneys with little to no fatigue, and am very pleased by the comfort design.

The Perixx trackball has less trackball surface / exposure than the Logitech M570 or original Trackman, but about the same as the MX Ergo. I tend to prefer the larger surface area as this allows for more precise “full turns” (0-180 degrees) in game. Also. it seems the ball bearings (on which the trackball sits and spins internally) are a bit too flush with the internal plastic trackball housing. Occasionally I'll find myself pressing a bit hard on the trackball and it gets stiff in the socket. This is my only complaint, and the only reason I can't give five stars. I did buy an extra "matte" finish trackball, so perhaps I'll try different balls in the mouse to see if this problem goes away, but it is relatively minor issue and may go away with some use (mouse "breaks-in"). The Perixx is still by far the most accurate of the trackball mice I've used, and I have seen immediate improvement with use of certain weapons in games.

The Perixx buttons are responsive (low profile / short travel distance) with decent "click" feedback. It has the typical wheel and forward / back buttons, but they did the mouse a great service by keeping it simple and not bloating it with too many buttons or odd positions or bells and whistles. The mouse also has a 400/1000 DPI switch, which I probably won’t use in game, but is far better balanced than the drastic 512/2048 change in the MX Ergo and could potentially be used (with practice) for Zoom or precision aiming. And the standard positioning of the DPI switch (behind the wheel) means no accidental in-game DPI resolution switching.

I have hoped and prayed (and even begged companies like Logitech and Razer) for a decent pro/gaming trackball mouse with no answers... until this mouse landed on my doorstep. As an experienced software / hardware engineer I even offered these companies my services to fix these problems or create new solutions for them, but it would seem they don’t consider anything to be broken.

The design and engineering of the Perixx trackball mouse, along with (simply taking the time to implement) Full-speed USB firmware for better polling rates and performance, puts this "value" trackball far above the vast majority of more expensive "performance" trackballs (which are really anything but).



Kensington SlimBlade Trackball Mouse (K72327U) Review:


I've used Kensington trackballs for 30 years now, since the old ADB days. Kensington makes the heaviest ball, which is essential for spinning and moving the mouse quickly. Like many others, I've been a bit dismayed at the general decline in quality and smoothness over the years, but they're still the best I can find.

My last two Expert trackballs were getting glitchy... one had a sticky scroll ring (even after cleaning and lubricating with graphite), and the other had electrical problems that made it 'drop' items sporadically. I decided to combine the two to get one last good one, and decided to try the SlimBlade to replace the one that was lost.

Needless to say, I'm extremely picky about these things – I need to move fast and intuitively on my desktop, and if the trackball is glitchy at all it aggravates me continuously. I was pleasantly surprised to see the design of the SlimBlade – they've eliminated a lot of problems the old Expert model had and reduced the moving parts. Instead of captive jewel bearings, the bearings are now fixed. But the ball moves perfectly smoothly all the same – it still has good size and heft. The buttons are part of the surface, but still move easily and predictably. They've put a hole in the bottom so the dust falls through and doesn't collect – very nice!

I was a bit thrown off at first regarding the 'ring' – I thought it must be some sort of touch-sensitive part (no, I don't read directions much). but instead, it detects when the two sensors are moving in the same direction and translates that to a scroll movement... very clever! And it eliminates one more moving piece that always seemed to gum up. It's took me 10 minutes to get used to, but I can already flick the ball horizontally and get the same or better speed I got with the Expert models (which were rarely fast or smooth). What's more, this action is nearly silent**, unlike the gritty rubbing noise of the Expert model. I record my screen and do voiceovers while I record, so having a quiet movement is a definite plus.

All in all, I think this is a definite improvement over the Expert model... it immediately felt smoother, more predictable and more intuitive. I just hope it lasts (the Expert balls were pretty durable)

** by default, there's a synthetic clicking noise when you scroll. It's not annoying for daily use at all, but it definitely is for recording. In order to make it completely silent, you have to remove 7 screws from the bottom (one under each rubber foot and then three arranged in a triangle under the rubber ring). Once apart, the noisemaker is at the top of the circuit board... it's a short cylinder with a hole in the top. You can carefully pry off the top of the noisemaker and remove the disk inside. I just left the top off and put the rest back together... now it's silent and perfect for recording.



Kensington Orbit Wireless Trackball Mouse with Touch Scroll Ring (K72352US) Review:


I just received this today, and have been using it for several hours, so this is definitely a "first impression" review.

I've been searching for a wireless trackball that I can use left-handed, and this is one of the very few out there.

Although right-handed, I've been mousing left handed for decades due to repetitive stress injuries in my right hand. I've always used the Logitech Trackman marble mouse for its ergonomics and that it's ambidextrous, so I can switch off to my right hand if I wish. But after all this time, left handed mousing feels normal and I find I actually prefer it, even though my right hand is healed -- I can mouse with one hand and takes notes with the other at the same time!

One downside to the Logitech is that it's wired, and while it's fine on my office desktop, it's a pain for travel, meetings, etc. So far the overall feel and operation of the Kensington Orbit is so close to the Logitech that I barely notice the difference. It has a good feel to it, the buttons work well, and the trackball pointing is smooth.

Why I didn't give it 5 stars -- The touch scrolling is a little cumbersome. It might just take some getting used to, but I'm finding it jumpy and not very precise. Also the Kensington TrackballWorks software caused a bunch of problems. Right after installing it was like aliens had taken over my computer...the cursor was flying around on its own, opening multiple copies of programs...so weird. So I ended up uninstalling it and using the native Windows drivers, which work just fine. If you get this, it works fine plug and play right out of the box. My advice is just use it this way and forget the TrackballWorks software.

If any issues come up over the next few weeks I'll edit this review.