Best Computer Graphics Cards in 2020



MSI Gaming GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 192-bit HDMI/DP 6GB GDRR6 HDCP Support DirectX 12 Dual Fan VR Ready OC Graphics Card (GTX 1660 TI Ventus XS 6G OC) Review:


The MSI Ventus XS OC is a solid design at NVidia's MSRP for the 1660Ti. A two-fan, two-slot design with a backplate will fit in just about any system, short of an ITX system (pictures in my review are the 1660Ti installed in a Micro-ATX case build).

For under $300, the performance and capabilities of this card blow away any and all competition. You can pretty much expect GTX 1070-like performance (some games, it will run faster than a 1070, others slower, but on average, expect pretty-much 1070 performance at a cost that is less than the 1070 was when it launched). The #1 card people use on STEAM right now is the GTX 1060-6GB... this card is a solid 35%-40% faster than a GTX 1060 and will probably replace it as the #1 card on STEAM in the near-future (it's that good). In AMD's corner, at the same price point is the RX 590... this card is 25% faster than a RX 590 and uses half the power consumption, running cooler, quieter and playing games better than the RX 590.

Nvidia has also enabled AMD Freesync monitor support in their GeForce drivers... and it can be any Freesync monitor, not just one on their shortlist. Simply use the latest NVidia drivers, turn-on Freesync on your monitor choose "Set up G-SYNC" in your NVidia Control panel and turn it on (only works in Win10, btw). I am using my 1660Ti with an AMD Freesync monitor and it works just great!

There really is no other card in this price bracket that offers better performance, better power usage or that runs cooler for the gaming muscle this card provides. MSI's conservative 2-fan, 2-slot design in the Ventus XS is a well-rounded solid choice without strange gimmicks, too many or too few fans or crazy 3-slot designs seen from it's competitors... all this at NVidia's MSRP makes this simply the best graphics card under $300 at the time of launch.

One of the pictures is a GPU comparison using the Radeon RX 580 as a baseline of 100% tested on Assassins Creed Odyssey at 1080p (courtesy of Tech Deals on YouTube)... every other card listed is in comparison to the RX 580 on the same game and shows how much faster it is in comparison... so the GTX 1660Ti is 42% faster than an RX 580 in that test. Certainly there are faster cards out there, but you need to compare how much you are spending for the performance you are getting... the 1660Ti is a great card for the performance at this price point.

For reference, I took pictures of my build with the GeForce GTX 1660Ti installed...
Intel i7 4790 (Haswell)
MSI H87M-G43 Motherboard w/16GB DDR3
Fractal Design Focus G Mini MATX case



Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1660 OC 6G Graphics Card, 2X Windforce Fans, 6GB 192-bit GDDR5, Gv-N1660OC-6GD Video Card Review:


My Wife has an old Asus Essentio CM6730-08 from Best Buy, that we bought in 2012. We upgraded the stock GT 630 to a 1050 2GB (shown in one of the pictures) and it has been serving her well. Today I put the 1660 OC in it, and oh... my... god... After uninstalling and reinstalling GeForce Experience, it set most games to High or Highest and we're getting 1080p 60fps locked! On an i7-3770 (non K). All the sudden we're not as rushed to upgrade her computer. We definitely plan on doing that eventually though, and using this card in the new build.

For 220 dollars, I don't think you can go wrong with this card!

UPDATE: It's September 2019 and this card is a new home! A Ryzen 5 1600. Destiny 2 on Low preset, we get about 100 to 144fps depending on the area. This card is AMAZING for 60fps, and just OKAY for 144fps. I'm pushing 500+ mhz on the memory and 100mhz on the gpu clock in MSI AfterBurner. It hits a steady 2050mhz boost at 50 degrees with fans at 100 percent. In my Wife's case, you can't hear the GPU fans.

Now that she has a 144hz monitor, I definitely plan on finding a 1070ti or above to get the most out of the 144hz monitor. This GPU will not do that. My 1070ti STRIX (pushing 185 overclock on gpu clock, and 500 on memory), gets 144fps MOST of the time. Only certain areas and activities cause it to dip below 144. I can't speak for the ti version of the 1660, so I'd get a high end 1070 ti or above if you want more than 90fps.



Sapphire Technology Technology Radeon 11265-05-20G Pulse RX 580 8GB GDDR5 Dual HDMI/ DVI-D/ Dual DP OC with Backplate (UEFI) PCI-E Graphics Card Graphic Cards Review:


Awesome upgrade for my 2012 mac pro tower. Zero hassles, arrived sealed and perfect condition from Amazon. So happy prices came back down on these from crazy bitmining phase/fad.

UPDATE:
forgot to mention; if using with older Apple LED Cinema Display, with the attached (non removable) mini-DP cable; you will need a mini-DP to DP converter cable (less than $10).

ALSO, here are the Geekbench 4 scores for the card on my Mac Pro 5,1 systems:
Sapphire Pulse RX580 => 136001
Sapphire RADEON 7950 Mac Edition => 89169
RADEON 7970 (overclocked) => 106493



Gigabyte GV-N1030OC-2GI Nvidia GeForce GT 1030 OC 2G Graphics Card Review:


I received my GT 1030 OC from Amazon Warehouse Deals (AWD) today and promptly installed it in my 11 year old HP Pavilion Elite M9200t [Intel Core2 Quad CPU Q9450 @ 2.66 GHz 2.67 Ghz, 8GB RAM, Win10 64 bit, PCIe 2.0}...piece of cake, and backward compatible with PCIe 2.0.

As other reviewers suggested, I didn't bother with the enclosed CD-I went to the Gigabyte website to install the latest drivers & the Aorus Engine, mainly to monitor the temperature due to past video card overheating experience (no gaming).

I'm replacing a seven year old EVGA GT 520 card that's been recently having a problem with the fan- it stops turning at inappropriate times and overheats (I used canned air & a vacuum a few times in the last two months to get out any dust particles that might be unseen, which helps for awhile ).

Last week, I tried an open-box Gigabyte GT 1030 silent low-profile (from AWD), but within minutes, it seemed to be running quite hot, despite multiple fans in my PC, so much so that it did sudden re-boots of my PC several times. It also had such a tall heatsink that it was smashing the firewire plug on my motherboard. Not sure if that had anything to do with the hot temp & multiple re-boots. I had to send it back. My power supply is a 385W that isn't maxed out so it's not that.

This GT 1030 SC isn't as tall as the fan-less GT 1030, so it's well below the firewire plug and has been running fine without any re-booting issues. The temp has stayed around 37°(C) with standard PC use (no gaming, just watching videos, web surfing, MS Office, etc).

So far, this card seems like the perfect replacement for an old PC like mine or newer machine.

NOT reflected in my review rating is that I went with AWD to save a few dollars over a new item. I'm not opposed to an open-box product if it works as it should. I'll admit, I was initially concerned about the condition of the card when I saw the box's condition, but the card seems to function fine. AWD's description of the item was accurate. Everything is running great! :o)

UPDATE April 25, 2019: Three months later, this card is still working great on my 11 year old HP Pavilion Elite M9200t (no "gaming", just Microsoft Office 2016, graphics/photo editing, some video editing, Internet, machine embroidery digitizing & designing, etc.)



MSI GAMING GeForce RTX 2060 6GB GDRR6 192-bit HDMI/DP Ray Tracing Turing Architecture VR Ready Graphics Card (RTX 2060 VENTUS 6G OC) Review:


I raced rfactor 2 with 3 screens and had a GTX 970 card which couldn't keep up. I purchased the RTX 2060 in hopes of solving my problems, it did. when i first install it the card i had trouble with MSI afterburner version 4.5.0. not letting me set my fans to help in cooling. since then version 4.6.0. lets me set my fans to automatically keep up with the game. had you not been able to set the fans i would have only given one star, it is that important in gaming.
on the old card Video usage was 100%, Temp 60 to 70c. new RTX card is 40% usage and 40 to 50c temp. under full race on-line or off with 30 cars on track.
things to know: When you get the card there is a serial number on the box. Make Sure you write down the number and code on the card, they will ask for it when you try to register your card with MSI. also, the card height - ADD another inch cause your wires plug into the top of the card - and is NOT Flush. i didn't have a clearance problem with this, but you might.
Rfactor does not use race tracing at this time, but if they ever do i will be ready. card fans are not noisy. if you have an old card like i did and you are sitting on the fence - go for it!



MSI Gaming GeForce GT 710 2GB GDRR3 64-bit HDCP Support DirectX 12 OpenGL 4.5 Single Fan Low Profile Graphics Card (GT 710 2GD3 LP) Review:


I need a graphic card upgrade for a very old compact desktop PC, Acer Aspire A3910 from 2010. This MSI GeForce GT 710 is an entry-level graphic card that fits my requirements perfectly. Here are several reasons why I picked this card instead of something more powerful:
- It is relatively inexpensive.
- It is low profile and occupies only one PCI slot. This is important since my PC has a SFF (small form factor) case with limited space.
- It consumes very little power (20W max), so even the 220W power supply in my PC can handle it.
- It uses only heatsink for passive cooling. This eliminates the noise and reliability problems associated with cooling fans.

[Installation Confusion]
- Initially right after the graphic card was installed, I can only get a display of 1200x800 from the HDMI port. Nothing from VGA port.
- After I installed the MSI VGA Drivers from disc, my monitor can now display 1920x1080 from VGA port, but nothing from HDMI port.

The problem could be from my computer's motherboard, since I observed the same behavior with the EVGA GeForce 210 I previously purchased (and returned). Just keep this behavior in mind, in case you cannot see any display right after installing the card.

[Graphic Performance]
I ran the 3DMARK 'Cloud Gate' benchmark on my PC, both before and after the graphic card upgrade:
- With integrated graphic, the overall score is a pathetic 209.
- After installing the GT 710, the score jumps up to 3735!
(see my uploaded screenshots for details)

On the other hand, the GT 710 cannot hold a candle against my better graphic card, the EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti. When both cards were tested in a newer desktop PC (Asus M32CD), the 750 gives about 4x higher score . Note that the 750 does not fit in my old SFF PC since it is much larger. See my photo uploaded for size comparison between 710 and 750.

[Power Consumption]
I used the EUM-A1 Power Usage Meter to measure the input power of my computer:
- Before the graphic card upgrade, my computer consumes ~50-55W when idle, ~70-75W when running 3DMARK.
- After the upgrade to GT 710, my PC consumes the same 50-55W when idle. This means this graphic card has the same standby power as the integrated graphic chip set.
- When running 3DMARK or XCOM: Enemy Unknown, my PC now consumes up to 85-90W. That means the graphic card consumes 15-20W when it is running at full speed.

After I played XCOM for several hours, the heatsink becomes too hot to touch, but not hot enough to cause a shutdown. In contrast, the EVGA GeForce 210 suffers thermal shudown after just ~10-20 minutes of playing XCOM. This is because the 210 consumes more power (30W vs. 20W) but comes with a smaller heatsink.

[Conclusion]
The GT 710 works very well in my particular situation. Of cause this is an inexpensive entry-level card, so I cannot expect the same level of performance as my GeForce GTX 750 Ti. But for a very small investment, I'm suddenly able to play many games which were previously unplayable on my old SFF PC. For that I'm happy.



MSI Gaming GeForce GT 710 1GB GDRR3 64-bit HDCP Support DirectX 12 OpenGL 4.5 Heat Sink Low Profile Graphics Card (GT 710 1GD3H LPV1) Review:


I need a graphic card upgrade for a very old compact desktop PC, Acer Aspire A3910 from 2010. This MSI GeForce GT 710 is an entry-level graphic card that fits my requirements perfectly. Here are several reasons why I picked this card instead of something more powerful:
- It is relatively inexpensive.
- It is low profile and occupies only one PCI slot. This is important since my PC has a SFF (small form factor) case with limited space.
- It consumes very little power (20W max), so even the 220W power supply in my PC can handle it.
- It uses only heatsink for passive cooling. This eliminates the noise and reliability problems associated with cooling fans.

[Installation Confusion]
- Initially right after the graphic card was installed, I can only get a display of 1200x800 from the HDMI port. Nothing from VGA port.
- After I installed the MSI VGA Drivers from disc, my monitor can now display 1920x1080 from VGA port, but nothing from HDMI port.

The problem could be from my computer's motherboard, since I observed the same behavior with the EVGA GeForce 210 I previously purchased (and returned). Just keep this behavior in mind, in case you cannot see any display right after installing the card.

[Graphic Performance]
I ran the 3DMARK 'Cloud Gate' benchmark on my PC, both before and after the graphic card upgrade:
- With integrated graphic, the overall score is a pathetic 209.
- After installing the GT 710, the score jumps up to 3735!
(see my uploaded screenshots for details)

On the other hand, the GT 710 cannot hold a candle against my better graphic card, the EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti. When both cards were tested in a newer desktop PC (Asus M32CD), the 750 gives about 4x higher score . Note that the 750 does not fit in my old SFF PC since it is much larger. See my photo uploaded for size comparison between 710 and 750.

[Power Consumption]
I used the EUM-A1 Power Usage Meter to measure the input power of my computer:
- Before the graphic card upgrade, my computer consumes ~50-55W when idle, ~70-75W when running 3DMARK.
- After the upgrade to GT 710, my PC consumes the same 50-55W when idle. This means this graphic card has the same standby power as the integrated graphic chip set.
- When running 3DMARK or XCOM: Enemy Unknown, my PC now consumes up to 85-90W. That means the graphic card consumes 15-20W when it is running at full speed.

After I played XCOM for several hours, the heatsink becomes too hot to touch, but not hot enough to cause a shutdown. In contrast, the EVGA GeForce 210 suffers thermal shudown after just ~10-20 minutes of playing XCOM. This is because the 210 consumes more power (30W vs. 20W) but comes with a smaller heatsink.

[Conclusion]
The GT 710 works very well in my particular situation. Of cause this is an inexpensive entry-level card, so I cannot expect the same level of performance as my GeForce GTX 750 Ti. But for a very small investment, I'm suddenly able to play many games which were previously unplayable on my old SFF PC. For that I'm happy.



MSI Gaming GeForce GT 710 2GB GDRR3 64-bit HDCP Support DirectX 12 OpenGL 4.5 Heat Sink Low Profile Graphics Card (GT 710 2GD3H LP) Review:


I need a graphic card upgrade for a very old compact desktop PC, Acer Aspire A3910 from 2010. This MSI GeForce GT 710 is an entry-level graphic card that fits my requirements perfectly. Here are several reasons why I picked this card instead of something more powerful:
- It is relatively inexpensive.
- It is low profile and occupies only one PCI slot. This is important since my PC has a SFF (small form factor) case with limited space.
- It consumes very little power (20W max), so even the 220W power supply in my PC can handle it.
- It uses only heatsink for passive cooling. This eliminates the noise and reliability problems associated with cooling fans.

[Installation Confusion]
- Initially right after the graphic card was installed, I can only get a display of 1200x800 from the HDMI port. Nothing from VGA port.
- After I installed the MSI VGA Drivers from disc, my monitor can now display 1920x1080 from VGA port, but nothing from HDMI port.

The problem could be from my computer's motherboard, since I observed the same behavior with the EVGA GeForce 210 I previously purchased (and returned). Just keep this behavior in mind, in case you cannot see any display right after installing the card.

[Graphic Performance]
I ran the 3DMARK 'Cloud Gate' benchmark on my PC, both before and after the graphic card upgrade:
- With integrated graphic, the overall score is a pathetic 209.
- After installing the GT 710, the score jumps up to 3735!
(see my uploaded screenshots for details)

On the other hand, the GT 710 cannot hold a candle against my better graphic card, the EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti. When both cards were tested in a newer desktop PC (Asus M32CD), the 750 gives about 4x higher score . Note that the 750 does not fit in my old SFF PC since it is much larger. See my photo uploaded for size comparison between 710 and 750.

[Power Consumption]
I used the EUM-A1 Power Usage Meter to measure the input power of my computer:
- Before the graphic card upgrade, my computer consumes ~50-55W when idle, ~70-75W when running 3DMARK.
- After the upgrade to GT 710, my PC consumes the same 50-55W when idle. This means this graphic card has the same standby power as the integrated graphic chip set.
- When running 3DMARK or XCOM: Enemy Unknown, my PC now consumes up to 85-90W. That means the graphic card consumes 15-20W when it is running at full speed.

After I played XCOM for several hours, the heatsink becomes too hot to touch, but not hot enough to cause a shutdown. In contrast, the EVGA GeForce 210 suffers thermal shudown after just ~10-20 minutes of playing XCOM. This is because the 210 consumes more power (30W vs. 20W) but comes with a smaller heatsink.

[Conclusion]
The GT 710 works very well in my particular situation. Of cause this is an inexpensive entry-level card, so I cannot expect the same level of performance as my GeForce GTX 750 Ti. But for a very small investment, I'm suddenly able to play many games which were previously unplayable on my old SFF PC. For that I'm happy.



GIGABYTE GeForce GT 1030 GV-N1030D5-2GL Low Profile 2G Computer Graphics Card Review:


I purchased this to upgrade my older rig- while my "main" PC is in my office, my "old" PC is in my living room- so it does get quite a lot of use. I tend to play fairly easy-to-run games on the PC in question, but even still, the MSI R7 250 2GB DDR3 inside was struggling.

Fable Anniversary could barely pull down 30FPS on medium settings. Wolfenstein The New Order/The Old Blood would be at 25-30FPS on low/medium settings. Even Crusader Kings II, Hearts of Iron III/IV, and Stellaris ran at sub-60FPS on low/medium settings.

I purchased the GT 1030 to remedy these faults, and boy, was I not disappointed. 60+ FPS on Fable Anniversary on max settings. Steady 55-60FPS on Wolfenstein on max (okay, very close to max) settings. Paradox games went from a 20-25FPS to well over 70. I was quite shocked by the latter.

To wrap up my review of its performance- let's talk over clocking. Once (basic) drivers are installed via the included CD, a built in clock control program is also installed. It is easier to use than Afterburner, having safe presets- but does not allow for as much control until specifically placed in "professional" mode. Otherwise, the clock speeds are just fine for a 69 dollar card. On top of that, the VRAM is DDR5- a massive upgrade for those still running DDR3 VRAM.

As to the more physical nature of the card- wow, is it tiny. Less than half the size of my replaced R7 250, probably a quarter of the size of the 1070 in my main computer. Far lighter as well.

Installation was simple, as it only draws power directly from the PCI slot/motherboard. Speaking of power- this thing barely draws any. Can't recall exactly, but I know that it's a minuscule amount. As long as you have a 300-350W power supply, you'll be fine.

Be warned- given the size, this card only produces ONE DVI port and ONE HDMI port. That's it. Just something to think about. I was a bit surprised they didn't put a VGA slot on a card NVIDIA is touting as the answer to every budget gamer's needs- but I digress. I suppose even HDMI-sporting monitors/TVs are cheap nowadays.

Card is whisper silent, although the first time I installed it, it spun hard and fast for a few minutes, and made considerable noise- don't freak out if that happens. She has great thermals, but I do have an overkill cooling setup in this PC, so results there are probably skewed for the average person who isn't obsessed with cooling.

Anyways, a $69, low-profile, Pascal-based, NVIDIA GPU? It's not too good to be true. Give it a shot if you're on a budget, have power or size restrictions,or even if you're just an NVIDIA or GPU enthusiast. It won't replace your 1070, but it will definitely surprise you- especially given its small form factor and low power draw.

Just a quick side note before I stop rambling- don't ask me how but- I'm pretty positive NVIDIA will be releasing a GT 1040 soon, perhaps by the end of the year. For those that aren't in a rush- perhaps wait for that?



XFX Radeon RX 580 GTS XXX Edition 1386MHz OC+, 8GB GDDR5, VR Ready, Dual BIOS, 3xDP HDMI DVI, AMD Graphics Card (RX-580P8DFD6) Review:


This card can handle games(destiny, fortnite, Pubg...etc) at high FPS with no issues. The card does use more power than an nvidia card with similar specs and also creates more heat. But at the same time value for the spec is great. As a product I would give it 4 stars however, XFX's warranty service is surprisingly easy and fast. My card broke after a year of use, so I registered the product on their site, I received a response within 24 hours. They troubleshooted and determined the card needs to be RMAed, I sent the card back and I received a new one within a week after they received the defective card. They didn't even require the receipt(required by most companies) even though I had it. It's amazing service compare to my PNY nvidia experience which was like pulling teeth. I will definitely buy more XFX products in the future.