Best Classical Guitar Strings in 2020



D'Addario EJ45TT ProArte DynaCore Classical Guitar Strings, Titanium Trebles, Normal Tension Review:


These strings were recommended to me by my online guitar teacher (Tomas Michaud, who is very good, by the way, for anyone not in a position to receive personal instruction for whatever reason). Which strings you choose is a very subjective decision, and the same answer will not apply to everyone, but these have worked well for me. I changed strings the first time after I bought my classical style guitar with a set recommended by the salesman at the guitar store where I purchased it, but was disappointed that my guitar no longer had the same brightness and clarity of sound afterward, and the sustain was very short. These characteristics didn't go well with my interest in Spanish-style music, so I asked for a recommendation from my teacher, and these are the ones he currently uses. They restored the sound that I fell in love with when I bought my guitar. I found that they did take a bit of getting used to, though, on the non-wound strings. The material they are made of is inherently a bit more "slippery" (for lack of a better adjective) than some other strings, which requires more careful placement of the fingers to avoid having a string slide around under your finger in some situations. This is not necessarily a bad thing- it encourages careful attention to technique, and after a little time playing with them, I was fine. I am able to replicate the nice, clear tone and long sustain I hear on some of the recordings I have of Flamenco music, which is what I was hoping for.



D'Addario EJ45C Pro-Arte Composite Classical Guitar Strings, Normal Tension Review:


I've used the D'Addario Composites on and off since they debuted in the early 1990s. There are more strings choices on the market than back in the day but I always come back to the Composites. The tone is a traditional mellow timbre, similar to Dynacore and the standard EJ44, but with a brighter sounding G. The problem with nylon 3rd strings is they tend to be too mellow—even dull and tubby—and this tan colored monofilament has more bite. So better for lyric solos up and down the 3rd (G) string and a smoother transition between bass and treble timbre. A nice thing about the monofilament 3rd string is it almost lasts forever. The other trebles will be scratched and worn, losing tone and sustain after a couple weeks of hard playing but I can leave the 3rd string on through many changes of basses and trebles.

Be careful when winding up to pitch as both the bass and monofilament 3rd string require about 75% fewer turns to hit pitch than standard nylons. If you simply turn the tuning key the amount of turns standard strings need, you'll be an octave high and break a string. Finally, the both the bass and monofilament 3rd string stretch out quickly, holding their pitch much sooner than regular nylon strings. The two upper trebles are just standard nylon so they stretch forever.



D'Addario EJ27N 3/4 Student Nylon Fractional Classical Guitar Strings, Normal Tension Review:


These are good strings. I used them on a Honer 1/2 sized "folk" play and learn kids guitar I picked up at a goodwill for about $8. I got it because it was cheap and I actually really enjoyed playing it vs. my "real" guitars. I also don't mind if my 5yr old wants to play with it.

These strings are a much lighter gauge than what was on it, which I believe to be the factory ones. These new lighter strings look and feel more appropriate to the scale of the guitar and they also have a better/brighter sound, though that of course could be simply due to new strings vs. who knows how old the ones they replaced were. These are probably better strings than the thing deserves... it's barely above toy status and nothing aside from divine intervention would make it anything else. Still, good strings are good strings. A few good stretches on them when stringing and tuning them up helps settle them in a little faster but they will lose tune constantly until they are stretched in, that's pretty much just how guitar strings are as far as I know but these do take a while to find their balance.



D'Addario EJ27N 1/2 Student Nylon Fractional Classical Guitar Strings, Normal Tension Review:


These are good strings. I used them on a Honer 1/2 sized "folk" play and learn kids guitar I picked up at a goodwill for about $8. I got it because it was cheap and I actually really enjoyed playing it vs. my "real" guitars. I also don't mind if my 5yr old wants to play with it.

These strings are a much lighter gauge than what was on it, which I believe to be the factory ones. These new lighter strings look and feel more appropriate to the scale of the guitar and they also have a better/brighter sound, though that of course could be simply due to new strings vs. who knows how old the ones they replaced were. These are probably better strings than the thing deserves... it's barely above toy status and nothing aside from divine intervention would make it anything else. Still, good strings are good strings. A few good stretches on them when stringing and tuning them up helps settle them in a little faster but they will lose tune constantly until they are stretched in, that's pretty much just how guitar strings are as far as I know but these do take a while to find their balance.



D'Addario EJ49 Pro-Arte Black Nylon Classical Guitar Strings, Normal Tension Review:


It's impossible to not seperat the nylon strings from the silvers in a review. The black nylon will last for years and years where the silver round strings will go dull in 6 to 12 months .the sound quality from the black carbon nylons are good and average in tuning loss and warm up time needed to hold a time.the silvers are a bit more bassy and I like that.they all stretch at the same rate as any other nylon set. Plusses are bright highs bright but loud and bassy lows and a match for any flamenco set I've played but way cheaper because they are mass produced.



D'Addario Pro-Arte Nylon Classical Guitar Strings, Normal Tension (EJ45) Review:


I've been playing for 34 years. I'm not a pro and I don't get to play as much as I'd like. I have several classical and electrics - all carefully chosen. So, strings tend to stay on my guitars for a while. These have held up really well and sound great to my ear. After several weeks of sitting they are only very slightly off. Will definitely reorder when I need more! I use RIG gun oil to lubricate all my guitar strings between playing. Keeps the corrosion down really well. I've had strings last and still be playable for months and months. I see people recommending changing strings every 2 weeks and just shake my head. Classical strings aren't even stabilized at 2 weeks to my ear.

Bottom line - I've played a lot of classical strings over the years. These are some of the nicest I have played and are better than many I've played that were a lot more expensive. Excellent deal! Don't expect strings to compensate for a bad guitar. You are far, far better off really searching for a great sounding guitar than spending a fortune on designer strings. If you manage to find a great sounding guitar, I believe you will be very happy with these strings.



D’Addario EJ45-3D Pro-Arte Nylon Classical Guitar Strings, Normal Tension (3 Sets) – Nylon Core Basses, Laser Selected Trebles - Offers Balance of Volume and Comfortable Resistance Review:


I've been playing for 34 years. I'm not a pro and I don't get to play as much as I'd like. I have several classical and electrics - all carefully chosen. So, strings tend to stay on my guitars for a while. These have held up really well and sound great to my ear. After several weeks of sitting they are only very slightly off. Will definitely reorder when I need more! I use RIG gun oil to lubricate all my guitar strings between playing. Keeps the corrosion down really well. I've had strings last and still be playable for months and months. I see people recommending changing strings every 2 weeks and just shake my head. Classical strings aren't even stabilized at 2 weeks to my ear.

Bottom line - I've played a lot of classical strings over the years. These are some of the nicest I have played and are better than many I've played that were a lot more expensive. Excellent deal! Don't expect strings to compensate for a bad guitar. You are far, far better off really searching for a great sounding guitar than spending a fortune on designer strings. If you manage to find a great sounding guitar, I believe you will be very happy with these strings.



D'Addario Pro-Arte Nylon Classical Guitar Strings, Light Tension (EJ43) Review:


I've been playing for 34 years. I'm not a pro and I don't get to play as much as I'd like. I have several classical and electrics - all carefully chosen. So, strings tend to stay on my guitars for a while. These have held up really well and sound great to my ear. After several weeks of sitting they are only very slightly off. Will definitely reorder when I need more! I use RIG gun oil to lubricate all my guitar strings between playing. Keeps the corrosion down really well. I've had strings last and still be playable for months and months. I see people recommending changing strings every 2 weeks and just shake my head. Classical strings aren't even stabilized at 2 weeks to my ear.

Bottom line - I've played a lot of classical strings over the years. These are some of the nicest I have played and are better than many I've played that were a lot more expensive. Excellent deal! Don't expect strings to compensate for a bad guitar. You are far, far better off really searching for a great sounding guitar than spending a fortune on designer strings. If you manage to find a great sounding guitar, I believe you will be very happy with these strings.



D'Addario EJ27N Student Nylon Classical Guitar Strings, Normal Tension Review:


This string compares significantly to the Pro-Arte string. The sizes are the same but it costs a buck or two less. It's so similar I contacted D'Addario to ask them what the difference was. They stated the Pro-Arte strings are made of a better nylon and to more stringent specs... but in all honesty I wonder if the strings aren't identical but these marketed primarily to students and schools as a more economical string.

Whatever is the actuality-- both sets are of quality manufacture. They're D'Addario... and D'Addario never produces junk. Their cheapest string is as good or better than more expensive strings in other brands. I've never used a set of D'Addario in any classification of guitar that I didn't like.

For those who are curious, I'd recommend doing what I did: buy a set of these and a set of the Pro-Arte (they're both pretty inexpensive) and compare and see which you like best... or if you like both equally. I think it would be good to get several reviews here of such a test between the two grades. Whichever set one ultimately chooses, can't go wrong with the quality/price ratio.



Ernie Ball Earthwood Folk Nylon Ball End Set, Clear and Gold Review:


I really like these so far. I put them on a 40+ year old 3/4 size Yamaha I haven't played in years. I agree the G string is a bit dull, hence the 4 vs 5 stars. They have been on for less than 24 hours, so I will post an update if it changes. For those going from a metal string acoustic and trying these for the first time, be advised they stretch........a lot. Classical guitar tuning pegs are a little thicker than steel string acoustic pegs and you will find yourself cranking a lot on the peg to get them to pitch. I stretched them a bit after first tune and repeated the tune, stretch a few times. I finally got it close then let it sit over night. They had pretty much lost two full steps when checked the next day, re-tuned, re-stretched, then tuned again. They finally seem close to holding pitch. Kind of a pain, but I LOVE the tone. It will be worth it in the long run. In 40 years of guitar playing, I have tried many, many different brands of strings. I always go back to Ernie Ball for 6 string acoustic and electric. These seem to carry on my faith in them.

10/25/2014- I am adding an addendum to this after having them on my guitar a while. I still like them, the g string is still a little dull. There isn't a whole lot of volume on my guitar from these. However, the reason behind this is not the strings, and anyone putting these on a non-classical acoustic will more than likely have the same experience. Classical guitars, in general, are a lot lighter than steel string acoustics. Primarily because they don't have all of the x-bracing internally. The sound board (the top or face of the guitar) is also usually a little thinner and lighter. Consequently you will not get the brightness you may expect from a true classical.