Best Blank CD-R Discs in 2020



Verbatim CD-R 700MB 52X DataLifePlus White Inkjet Printable, Hub Printable - 50pk Spindle - 94755 Review:


The Manufacturer string returned by ImgBurn for these discs is Mitsubishi Chemical Corp. That means that Mitsubishi made these and not CMC. Mitsubishi is one of the best manufacturers of optical media out there; CMC is one of the worst. If you buy any non DataLifePlus CD-R's from Verbatim, they're made by CMC. So any Verbatim CD-R's bought from a brick and mortar store will be CMC. You should always avoid the non DataLifePlus CD-R's and DVD recordable discs. Any Life series DVD-R's will be CMC. CMC DVD recordable discs fail to burn about 50% of the time. Those 50% that do burn are usually not recognizable as playable discs by DVD players that are capable of reading that particular type of recordable DVD. CMC used to make a passable DVD+R but their quality declined in recent years. CMC is too unreliable so they cannot be trusted for quality.

I burned 2 of these in my Pioneer Blu-Ray burner and they burned and verified fine. My PS3 also had no problem playing these CD's back.

I cannot review the quality of the inkjet printable surface as I have no such printer to use with them. I get these discs, though, for the future, in case I ever get one. Plus, one can write on the surface with a CD safe marker to also label them.



Verbatim CD-R 700MB 52X White Inkjet Printable Recordable Media Disc - 100pk Spindle Review:


I prefer white surface CD-R's over branded surface CD-R's because writing info on the CD looks much better and the full surface is usable. However, there are two distinct types of this type of CD-R that Verbatim sells. The one with the white surface that includes the center hub portion (this listing) has a slightly rougher surface, while the other style leaves the hub portion clear and has a smoother, semi-gloss surface. I'm not sure of the difference if your application involves ink jet printing on the CD as I have no experience with that yet. However, if you are using Sharpies to write on these, the difference is stark. Sharpie writing on the rougher surface CD looks like a Sharpie running out of ink and frankly looks terrible. On the glossier surface, clear hub CD-R, Sharpies look excellent. It took me awhile to figure this out as I've been going back and forth between these two types of CD-R for awhile before finally realizing this. My preference is the Verbatim White CD-R. That is how it's branded on the clear hub. I did a search on Amazon and instantly found this. Comes in a plastic spindle with a plastic casing that is wrapped with Verbatim info. I buy them in 100 unit amounts and this particular setup claims a 100 year archival life. I find Verbatim CD-R's to be of superb quality with almost no duds.
I use professional Tascam CD Recorders that record in real time as well as pro duplicators. I definitely vouch for the quality of Verbatim CD's. Now if someone would make a machine to make simple, fast labels directly on CD's that look excellent and have a variety of type styles and colors (without going to a computer) I'd be real happy.



Verbatim CD-R 700MB 80 Minute 52x Recordable Disc - 100 Pack Spindle (FFP) - 97458 Review:


Before I go into my lengthy reasons, let me say, the Verbatim CD-Rs have the longest life of any CD-R I've ever used.

As far as CD-Rs go, a main concern is longevity. The major problem is that some CD-Rs start to develop "CD rot" after a while. That is when the ultra-thin reflective layer (usually aluminum), where the audio or other data is stored, starts to oxidize (rust), usually because of a manufacturing fault or mishandling of the disc. This leads to a deterioration in the sound, which begins as slight audible clicks which, over time, become louder and more frequent. Eventually, the rot will become so bad that the disc won't play at all.

I used to be an audio engineer. At the studio I worked at, we tried many different brands of CD-Rs, everything from no-name product to the major brands. They were all over the map. I'll try not to name names, but sometimes some of the ones you would least expect withstood the test of time (like Office Depot), while other lower-priced CD-Rs rotted within two years. Most of the big-name brand CD-Rs we tried turned out to have, on average, about an 85/15 chance of surviving. The brand we came to rely on was Verbatim. I still have audio discs made on Verbatim CD-Rs 18 years ago that still play absolutely fine. I can remember only a few that I had that bit the dust, buy hey, 1 out of every 200 or so... that's a damn good ratio. Even those were probably due to a slight manufacturing error on a single disc in a batch, or me accidentally dropping it at some point.

Verbatim is the brand I always rely upon.



Verbatim CD-R 700MB 52X White Inkjet Hub Printable Recordable Media Disc - 100pk Spindle Review:


I've used these for nearly ten years at my synagogue to record sermons and make copies for our members. I've purchased thousands upon thousands of these discs during that time and could probably count on my fingers the number of "coasters" I've made. These discs are of consistently high quality and they record well even at the highest speeds, and I've gone back and listened to recordings that are over 8 years and they still play perfectly. I use an Epson inkjet printer to print labels on them for a more professional look, and the white matte coating holds the ink very well. The ink will bleed when wet, but that's common with anything printed by an inkjet printer.

These are good, workhorse discs for storing audio, data, whatever fits. Highly recommended.



Verbatim 94691 CD-R 700MB 80 Minute 52x Recordable Disc - 50 Pack Review:


Before I go into my lengthy reasons, let me say, the Verbatim CD-Rs have the longest life of any CD-R I've ever used.

As far as CD-Rs go, a main concern is longevity. The major problem is that some CD-Rs start to develop "CD rot" after a while. That is when the ultra-thin reflective layer (usually aluminum), where the audio or other data is stored, starts to oxidize (rust), usually because of a manufacturing fault or mishandling of the disc. This leads to a deterioration in the sound, which begins as slight audible clicks which, over time, become louder and more frequent. Eventually, the rot will become so bad that the disc won't play at all.

I used to be an audio engineer. At the studio I worked at, we tried many different brands of CD-Rs, everything from no-name product to the major brands. They were all over the map. I'll try not to name names, but sometimes some of the ones you would least expect withstood the test of time (like Office Depot), while other lower-priced CD-Rs rotted within two years. Most of the big-name brand CD-Rs we tried turned out to have, on average, about an 85/15 chance of surviving. The brand we came to rely on was Verbatim. I still have audio discs made on Verbatim CD-Rs 18 years ago that still play absolutely fine. I can remember only a few that I had that bit the dust, buy hey, 1 out of every 200 or so... that's a damn good ratio. Even those were probably due to a slight manufacturing error on a single disc in a batch, or me accidentally dropping it at some point.

Verbatim is the brand I always rely upon.



Verbatim CD-R 700MB 80 Minute 52x Recordable Disc - 100 Pack Spindle (FFP) - 97458 Review:


Before I go into my lengthy reasons, let me say, the Verbatim CD-Rs have the longest life of any CD-R I've ever used.

As far as CD-Rs go, a main concern is longevity. The major problem is that some CD-Rs start to develop "CD rot" after a while. That is when the ultra-thin reflective layer (usually aluminum), where the audio or other data is stored, starts to oxidize (rust), usually because of a manufacturing fault or mishandling of the disc. This leads to a deterioration in the sound, which begins as slight audible clicks which, over time, become louder and more frequent. Eventually, the rot will become so bad that the disc won't play at all.

I used to be an audio engineer. At the studio I worked at, we tried many different brands of CD-Rs, everything from no-name product to the major brands. They were all over the map. I'll try not to name names, but sometimes some of the ones you would least expect withstood the test of time (like Office Depot), while other lower-priced CD-Rs rotted within two years. Most of the big-name brand CD-Rs we tried turned out to have, on average, about an 85/15 chance of surviving. The brand we came to rely on was Verbatim. I still have audio discs made on Verbatim CD-Rs 18 years ago that still play absolutely fine. I can remember only a few that I had that bit the dust, buy hey, 1 out of every 200 or so... that's a damn good ratio. Even those were probably due to a slight manufacturing error on a single disc in a batch, or me accidentally dropping it at some point.

Verbatim is the brand I always rely upon.



Verbatim CD-R 700MB 80 Minute 52x Recordable Disc - 30 Pack Spindle, BLUE - 95152 Review:


Before I go into my lengthy reasons, let me say, the Verbatim CD-Rs have the longest life of any CD-R I've ever used.

As far as CD-Rs go, a main concern is longevity. The major problem is that some CD-Rs start to develop "CD rot" after a while. That is when the ultra-thin reflective layer (usually aluminum), where the audio or other data is stored, starts to oxidize (rust), usually because of a manufacturing fault or mishandling of the disc. This leads to a deterioration in the sound, which begins as slight audible clicks which, over time, become louder and more frequent. Eventually, the rot will become so bad that the disc won't play at all.

I used to be an audio engineer. At the studio I worked at, we tried many different brands of CD-Rs, everything from no-name product to the major brands. They were all over the map. I'll try not to name names, but sometimes some of the ones you would least expect withstood the test of time (like Office Depot), while other lower-priced CD-Rs rotted within two years. Most of the big-name brand CD-Rs we tried turned out to have, on average, about an 85/15 chance of surviving. The brand we came to rely on was Verbatim. I still have audio discs made on Verbatim CD-Rs 18 years ago that still play absolutely fine. I can remember only a few that I had that bit the dust, buy hey, 1 out of every 200 or so... that's a damn good ratio. Even those were probably due to a slight manufacturing error on a single disc in a batch, or me accidentally dropping it at some point.

Verbatim is the brand I always rely upon.